Reddit Reddit reviews An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything

We found 14 Reddit comments about An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything
an American astronaut's self-help guide
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14 Reddit comments about An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything:

u/jdelator · 158 pointsr/funny

Did your comment mention the book titled

An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything

that was written by your dad Chris Hadfield

Which can be found here?
http://www.amazon.com/Astronauts-Guide-Life-Earth-Determination/dp/0316253014/

If so I have no idea why anyone would want to remove a comment referencing a book with this description
> Colonel Chris Hadfield has spent decades training as an astronaut and has logged nearly 4000 hours in space. During this time he has broken into a Space Station with a Swiss army knife, disposed of a live snake while piloting a plane, and been temporarily blinded while clinging to the exterior of an orbiting spacecraft. The secret to Col. Hadfield's success-and survival-is an unconventional philosophy he learned at NASA: prepare for the worst-and enjoy every moment of it.

> In An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, Col. Hadfield takes readers deep into his years of training and space exploration to show how to make the impossible possible. Through eye-opening, entertaining stories filled with the adrenaline of launch, the mesmerizing wonder of spacewalks, and the measured, calm responses mandated by crises, he explains how conventional wisdom can get in the way of achievement-and happiness. His own extraordinary education in space has taught him some counterintuitive lessons: don't visualize success, do care what others think, and always sweat the small stuff.

> You might never be able to build a robot, pilot a spacecraft, make a music video or perform basic surgery in zero gravity like Col. Hadfield. But his vivid and refreshing insights will teach you how to think like an astronaut, and will change, completely, the way you view life on Earth-especially your own."

u/Azby78 · 25 pointsr/space

Your brain also reacts as if it's been poisoned due to a sudden change to balance. Your inner ear which has been out of use for months suddenly kicks in and your body tries to throw up and lie down, similar to being incredibly sea sick! This makes it almost impossible to walk! Source: Chris Hadfield

u/digamelegume · 10 pointsr/nyc

Here's a little bit about the book and a link for the lazy:
An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything

Colonel Chris Hadfield has spent decades training as an astronaut and has logged nearly 4000 hours in space. During this time he has broken into a Space Station with a Swiss army knife, disposed of a live snake while piloting a plane, and been temporarily blinded while clinging to the exterior of an orbiting spacecraft. The secret to Col. Hadfield's success-and survival-is an unconventional philosophy he learned at NASA: prepare for the worst-and enjoy every moment of it.

In An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, Col. Hadfield takes readers deep into his years of training and space exploration to show how to make the impossible possible. Through eye-opening, entertaining stories filled with the adrenaline of launch, the mesmerizing wonder of spacewalks, and the measured, calm responses mandated by crises, he explains how conventional wisdom can get in the way of achievement-and happiness. His own extraordinary education in space has taught him some counterintuitive lessons: don't visualize success, do care what others think, and always sweat the small stuff.

You might never be able to build a robot, pilot a spacecraft, make a music video or perform basic surgery in zero gravity like Col. Hadfield. But his vivid and refreshing insights will teach you how to think like an astronaut, and will change, completely, the way you view life on Earth-especially your own.

u/coolio911911 · 9 pointsr/pics

An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth

"Colonel Chris Hadfield has spent decades training as an astronaut and has logged nearly 4000 hours in space. During this time he has broken into a Space Station with a Swiss army knife, disposed of a live snake while piloting a plane, and been temporarily blinded while clinging to the exterior of an orbiting spacecraft. The secret to Col. Hadfield's success-and survival-is an unconventional philosophy he learned at NASA: prepare for the worst-and enjoy every moment of it."

I read this book and absolutely loved it. It was easy to read, inspiring, and very informative. It's the first book I've ever given to another person just so they could enjoy because I wanted them to.

u/jonk88 · 2 pointsr/space

Since I don't see it here already I'll recommend Col. Chris Hadfield's book "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything". It's a fantastic read. It's also on Audible if that's more your thing.

u/refer_2_me · 1 pointr/videos

Hi-jacking the top comment because I looked for it.

For the lazy, here it is on amazon for $16.80. [GGG no referral link]

u/guruatma · 1 pointr/videos
u/dmanww · 1 pointr/motivation

Since you posted it in this sub, check out the book by Chris Hadfield

An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything

His interviews are great and it should help you get some perspective of what kind of traits you need to work on.

I find it's always helpful to find role models to keep motivated.

Also, you should probably do some research about the careers of UK astronauts. I'm not sure if they are all military or engineers. That way you can find the path that fits you best and start cutting it up into smaller and more manageable steps.

u/thepilleum · 1 pointr/indonesia

Currently reading Lord of Flies, 1954 and Don Quixote, 1605.

I already have had interest on literature, philosophy and books in general since... since I can remember. :/ But it was Oom Pram's Buru Tetralogie that made me fall deeper in love with books and classic literature in general.

Then, when I have started living abroad to study, I have developed big interests on classic world literature (Heck I even just learned Latin to understand about the 1500 years span of human literatures and maybe to read them myself when I have the sufficient skills to do so. Afterall, one of my personal reasons to learn language is to read the literature on its original language, because nothing match the beauty and uniqueness of one language that may 'lost' in translation).

As a poor student with tight budget and little spare time, I tried to buy second-hand books and read it time to time, like during the commuting time to class, etc.

I know, my finished read-list is not that great. Since the last months I have just finished reading George Orwell's 1984 and Animal Farm,,also Chris Hadfield's An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth.

My to-read-list has been reached to dozens and dozens of great titles. I try to fulfill it little by little like a small child.

I don't quite know about classic literature club or anything like that. I do realize that my interests are mostly unmainstream and heavy for my age. Thus I mostly enjoy them myself and I am quite content and happy with it. But if you want someone to discuss or talk, I can offer you a chance to geek-ly talk about that. Just drop a PM on me if you're interested and maybe we can exchange our contacts and do some 'book exchange' within each other.

P. S. Oscar Wilde's Picture of Dorian Grey is also on my to-read-list. Honestly I'm quite surprised to know that there is someone who also read literature from that time.

u/svetovit · 1 pointr/books

Astronauts Guide To Life on Earth

I don't read much non fiction but I demolished this book and loved every page.

u/MooseV2 · 1 pointr/todayilearned

In Chris Hadfield's book An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, he explains you're peeing for science roughly 25% of the time, and a urine collection can take around 40 minutes to complete.

>First you need to stretch that hot water bottle-esque bag to be sure the little septum between the condom and the bag is as open as it can be, so the force of your pee will overcome the little one-way valve and fill up the bag rather than squirting back out and all over you, all over the walls, all over—you get the picture. Once the bag is filled, you put it in a Ziploc bag just in case it leaks (at least once, it will) and shake it vigorously to make sure the chemical is mixed well with the urine.

>At this point, when your hands are covered with blobs of urine and drops are floating around the bathroom, too, it’s usually helpful to remind yourself that you are doing all this in the name of scientific inquiry. Take a minute to clean yourself up and while you’re at it, grab a disinfectant wipe—surely you’ve got a free hand!—and clean the ceilings and walls, too.

>All right, it’s time to fill the test tubes: depending on the experiment, sometimes you’ll only need to fill one, but typically it will be five. With a Sharpie, label each test tube with the time, date and your name. While you were shaking up the urine and chemical, bubbles formed in the sack, so now you need to spin it—gently!—like a centrifuge, so all the bubbles collect at the condom end. Then, through the little blue diaphragm, fill each test tube three-quarters full so there’s room for expansion after the sample freezes. Luckily, the tubes have Velcro on them so you can stick them to the wall. Once you’re done, seal up the big bag in the Ziploc, burping out any air, and clean yourself up again.

>Now it’s time to fire up the bar code reader and bar code the test tubes, then put them in a mesh bag and place it in a special -140 degree freezer, called a MELFI. It looks like something you’d see in a morgue, complete with sliding drawers that contain long, rectangular boxes. They’re so cold that you have to wear special white gloves to handle them, and you can only keep the freezer open for 60 seconds, so you don’t compromise any of the other biological samples already in there. That’s tricky, though, because as soon as you open a box, a bunch of previously filled mesh bags come floating out. Like a beekeeper, you’ve got to shove them back in the hive along with the new bag and close that drawer cleanly—if even a tiny corner of fabric gets caught, the thing will jam. This is actually something we practiced doing on the ground, where, of course, nothing was weightless and trying to escape. Here comes the fun part (seriously): as you slide the drawer back in, it flushes out ice crystals that envelop your upper body like the coolest cloud.

>Take off your gloves: you’re all done! And the whole procedure only took 40 minutes or so. Now you know how much time you’ll need to budget every single time you pee over the next four days, which is typically how long you have to give samples for any one experiment. Oh, and don’t forget to coordinate bathroom trips with crewmates who are also urinating for science—the MELFI can only be opened once every 45 minutes.

u/[deleted] · 1 pointr/offmychest

Please don't think that way. It's so easy to start questioning and blaming yourself. Just don't. You did everything right and you not having a job right now has nothing to do with you. Just the idea of evaluation yourself by number of open positions in the field is ridiculous. Just hang in there and see if you can use the time for something else for your well being. Learn. Gym. Read. Yoga. Socialize. Do stuff that cost more in terms of time than money and that you won't be able to do when you finally get that job. Enjoy it while it lasts and just make best of it. And don't ever condition your self-worth on something totally out of your control.

This guy explains it really good how it's perfectly ok to spend even your entire life training and studying and not ever getting to do it:

http://www.amazon.com/Astronauts-Guide-Life-Earth-Determination/dp/0316253014

I'm sure everything is going to be fine one way or the other, just try to make most of every day and less consumed about what if's in far future.