Reddit Reddit reviews BIG RED T64017 Torin Hydraulic Powersports Lift Jack (Motorcycle, ATV, UTV, Snowmobile): 3/4 Ton (1,500 lb) Capacity, Red

We found 3 Reddit comments about BIG RED T64017 Torin Hydraulic Powersports Lift Jack (Motorcycle, ATV, UTV, Snowmobile): 3/4 Ton (1,500 lb) Capacity, Red. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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BIG RED T64017 Torin Hydraulic Powersports Lift Jack (Motorcycle, ATV, UTV, Snowmobile): 3/4 Ton (1,500 lb) Capacity, Red
Ideal solution to your motorcycle, snowmobile, ATV, and UTV lifting needsFeatures a lifting range of 5-1/8" to 16-1/8" with a 3/4 ton (1,500 lb) load capacityEquipped with 6 locking positions and includes 2 locking swivel casters, a bottle jack, and a pulling barWide-load bearing jack is intended for the powersports enthusiast for maintenance or even lifting for off-season storagePowder-coat finished exterior provides long-lasting durability; Includes a 1 year limited manufacturer warranty
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3 Reddit comments about BIG RED T64017 Torin Hydraulic Powersports Lift Jack (Motorcycle, ATV, UTV, Snowmobile): 3/4 Ton (1,500 lb) Capacity, Red:

u/slick62 · 2 pointsr/motorcycles

I use a Big Red motorcycle jack that I also use to jack the wife's car for oil changes (with jack stands, of course). Got it on sale from Harbor Freight for about $49 years ago, they go for around $89 now.

Once you get the plastic off you can simply jack the bike using almost any jack, pivoting on rear wheel and sidestand (making sure bike is in gear so it doesn't roll). Then remove calipers, axle, and take wheel off. If you can manage to lift it without taking plastic off (as in the video below) that would be good as well.

You'll get told not to let the calipers hang by the hoses... so don't let calipers hang by the hoses.

This video shows front/rear removal, front starts about 3:45.

If you have the stock took kit it might provide what you need. Allen/hex wrench for the axle pinch bolts and the plug socket might fit the axle. Otherwise the guy in the video gives advice on a tool to get the axle out.

If you don't have much in the way of automotive tools, it's going to be an allen wrench set (for the pinch bolts), 22 or 24mm axle tool (or plug socket the appropriate mm end), valve core tool (some valve stem caps have a core remover end), bead breaker, and spoons.

If you have a gearhead friend they'd almost certainly have everything you need except maybe the axle tool (a correct plug socket possibly) and spoons. Walmart has a spoon set for about $19.

When you get to the actual tire removal/install, it's all about technique. The tire can be a bear to get off unless you keep the bead opposite from the side you're working on in the center well. Same is true when installing the new tire. I use a big C-clamp to keep the opposite beads together and it keeps the bead in the center of the wheel. Also, it might help to lay the new tire out in the sun as you begin the project. Warming it helps make it flexible.

Air... you're going to need to air the new tire enough to seat the beads. This can be about 60psi or more so prepare for that. If the new tire beads won't seat while you're airing it up, you may have to bounce the wheel/tire to get the beads to contact the side of the rim long enough to contain air. This can get very frustrating. A compressor helps because with a large volume of air it doesn't require the bead to contact very long, it almost immediately seals the tire and begins to seat the bead.

My tire change from a couple of days ago.

edit: all that and I forgot, most tires are directional. One of the tire change photos points that out. Having done this many times, like anything else trying to tell someone how it's done, many steps get left out because after so many iterations much of it is done unconsciously. Make sure you have a tire gauge handy. Some people get crazy about balancing, I don't balance but do line the yellow dot (if there's a dot) with the valve stem.

u/fromtheether · 1 pointr/mr2

I ended up using a friend's motorcycle jack, similar to this.

It worked out great, as we could strap it down using one of the arms of the jack to help keep it from wobbling and tipping around when pushing the new engine back under. The guide also suggests using a furniture dolly, which I imagine would work just as well, if not a bit better since the supports on it are probably a bit wider, helping to balance it better.

u/aeroplane1979 · 1 pointr/sportster

I picked up this one from Amazon for $100 w/prime shipping