Reddit Reddit reviews Condor Tool & Knife, Bushlore Camp Knife, 4-5/16in Blade, Hardwood Handle with Sheath

We found 38 Reddit comments about Condor Tool & Knife, Bushlore Camp Knife, 4-5/16in Blade, Hardwood Handle with Sheath. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Fixed Blade Hunting Knives
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Condor Tool & Knife, Bushlore Camp Knife, 4-5/16in Blade, Hardwood Handle with Sheath
Crafted from the highest quality materialsBuilt for performance and durabilityMade in El SalvadorHandle: HardwoodBlade Material: 1075 HIGH CARBON STEELBlade Finish: Blasted Satin
Check price on Amazon

38 Reddit comments about Condor Tool & Knife, Bushlore Camp Knife, 4-5/16in Blade, Hardwood Handle with Sheath:

u/martincline · 10 pointsr/Bushcraft

Condor Tool & Knife, Bushlore Camp Knife, 4-5/16in Blade, Hardwood Handle with Sheath https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002CC6BPM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_oLEYDb7EX5494

u/doomcrew2123 · 8 pointsr/knives

Other than the mora those are all pretty poor knives. Also see here.

u/chuckthetruk · 7 pointsr/knives

As you may or may not have recognized, this is the Condor Bushlore. Its blade is .125” thick made from 1075 carbon steel. The handle scales are walnut and the pins are brass (I think). The sheath is leather with stainless pins. These pictures are what it looks like after a weekend of extremely hard use in very damp conditions—I’ll talk more about this later. I took the pictures right after I cleaned it back up, and re-sharpened it.

I have been collecting knives for a while, and have quite a few, but did not own EVEN ONE fixed blade. I had a camping trip in the Finger Lakes region of NY, so I decided to pony up a whopping $31 and order one off amazon. When it arrived, the overwhelmingly positive reviews for the sheath were confirmed (it feels very high quality) as were the so-so reviews for the fit and finish of the knife itself. If you are looking for a fixed blade knife that is great to look at and fun to fondle, this might not be the knife for you. There is noticeable staining on the uneven handle scales, the pins and lanyard holes have grind marks on them (but are smooth to the touch), the grind is not a true Scandi (the blade had a secondary bevel when I received it, but it’s not a big deal, because I re-profiled it anyway), and the primary grind is actually uneven (this was brought out when I re-profiled it, one of the pictures shows this), and it came incredibly dull (hence the re-profiling).

So, how did it perform in the field? Very well! On two consecutive nights, in very damp conditions, it batoned through logs almost as thick as the blade is long, split about 9 bundles worth of wood (no-one had a hatchet) and performed other, less strenuous tasks like making wood shavings for kindling, carving tent stakes, and opening food packages etc. It was very comfortable to use, and held a good working edge for all of this. Now because it is carbon steel it did develop some significant surface rust, but that cleaned up very easily in just a few minutes.

In closing, this is a great camp knife for an incredible value. If you can get past the cosmetic imperfections, it’s an awesome little knife.

Let me know if you guys have any questions!

u/sampling_life · 6 pointsr/knives

I have the esee 5 (very similar to the BK2) and it is a big bad boy. the quarter inch thick makes it a beast at spliting via batoning or chopping. down side... it has a big fat edge that can kinda feel bulky when doing finer work... Honestly, I would look into a cheaper (yet very good blades) like a Mora or a Condor Bushlore... my pick would be the bushlore b/c of the grind and full tang but Moras are very good.

Then from there after using those blades a lot you'll get an idea of what you really want in your next blade.

u/WontDieIn_A_Hospital · 5 pointsr/knives

condor bushlore

If you're willing to spend 200 then go custom although at that point you're only getting style.

u/willogical · 5 pointsr/Bushcraft

You might consider the Condor Bushlore, especially if he's just getting into bushcraft, or even at an intermediate level. http://www.amazon.com/Condor-Bushlore-4-375-Inch-Walnut-Leather/dp/B002CC6BPM

Edit: I also agree that the Mora Classic is excellent and at the right price point, but I think the Condor Bushlore is also an excellent value and is in a few ways a step-up from the Mora. Its full tang, larger, and has an excellent leather sheath.

u/SamISaubrier · 4 pointsr/Survival

The Condor Bushlore is another great knife in the thirty-forty dollar range. Heavier and more robust than a Mora, but still a pleasant looking, non threatening blade. The leather sheath is a nice bonus too. I love my moras, but i can't help but think of them as a little disposable.

u/fromkentucky · 4 pointsr/Bushcraft

You can also buy a 1075 Carbon Steel Condor Bushlore for $35.82 on Amazon.

It's a little less brittle than 1095, but that just means you'll get a little more practice with sharpening, and your blade will be less likely to chip or break.

Really, it depends on your preference of Stainless vs. Carbon Steel. Boker makes good knives, Stainless is just a bit more difficult to sharpen, but it won't rust.

u/jassack04 · 4 pointsr/knifeclub

If you really want a monster sized knife, sure. But I'd definitely get the carbon steel version that some others have suggested as well. It sounds like their quality isn't too bad.

However, I don't know if I'd really want to take something that huge hiking. Maybe SHTF-type hiking I suppose.

A couple of knives that I'd think would be similar priced or less (and have proven reputations) and would slightly more practically fall into the "only 1" category:

u/Craig · 4 pointsr/Bushcraft

The Condor bushlore might be the sort of thing you're looking for.

u/ARKnife · 3 pointsr/knives

If full tang is important to you - check out the Condor Bushlore.

Has a full tang, scandi grind and a leather sheath.

u/AManAPlanACanalErie · 3 pointsr/BSA

Not a big fan of a knife with a concave belly for any of the tasks you need in scouting. I think a drop point or scandi will see you much better. I'm a big fan of either a Morakniv or (https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002CC6BPM/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1468198196&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=Condor+Tools+%26+Knives&dpPl=1&dpID=41dcdqwt7QL&ref=plSrch)[this].

u/voraidicon · 3 pointsr/knives

Keep looking. I like Condor knives as they are cheap-ish but tough and effective. See the Bushlore. Also, please don't be frightened away by r/knives's response. We generally do not like the B.G. series but I am sure you will get tons of other recommendations.

u/Gullex · 3 pointsr/Survival

$150 is plenty of budget for a good knife. This one is just slightly over that budget but will last you the rest of your life. It's kind of my dream survival knife.

The Fallkniven F1 is very popular as well and right in your price range.

Currently I use this knife which is also very good.

If you want to go a little less expensive still, Becker makes some good ones such as the Bk16. I know the Becker doesn't look anything like "hand made", but I have the BK2- I used paint remover to take the black coating off the blade, replaced the plastic handles with micarta and stained it to look more like wood, and built a leather sheath for it. It's a beautiful knife now. Too bad it's so goddamn heavy.

You could also go with something like the Mora bushcraft. I have that one also, very decent knife.

You could even just get a regular Mora or a Condor bushlore which are even more economical options.

u/TOUCHER_OF_SHEEP · 3 pointsr/EDC

It's definitely enough for a nice knife, though you might want to go a bit higher for a great knife. The KaBar BK2 is actually designed with things like batoning (hammering the knife through wood as a kind of faux hatchet using another piece of wood against the blade of the knife as the hammer itself) or chopping. It's a bit over $60, currently available for $69 to be precise, but as long as you don't flat out abuse it (prying heavy things, for example) it'll serve you well and quite possibly for the rest of your natural life.

At a lower price, you can get the Condor Bushlore, which at $35 is a perfectly valid choice that will serve you well indeed.

For an even lower price yet, the Mora Heavy Companion is from one of those few cheaper knife companies that does incredible work. I wouldn't baton with it, honestly, but even if you did it'd probably hold up just fine.

At a more expensive range, the Ontario Rat-5 is an amazing bushcraft knife. The Fallkniven Pilot Survival Knife is also an amazing knife. The Benchmade Bone Collector is spectacular knife made in D2 tool steel, one of the better steels available at that price. Another amazing knife is the Spyderco Bushcraft made in O1 tool steel. Finally, the Benchmade 162 is a pretty amazing knife.

One thing you'll notice about all of these knives with the exception of the Pilot Survival knife and the BM 162 is that they're all carbon steel knives. Carbon steel is a lot tougher than stainless (with a few very, very rare exceptions I'd never trust a long knife to be stainless steel) with the trade off of being a lot more of a hassle to take care of, since it needs to be regularly cleaned and oiled.

If you want a fire starter, carry a magnesium fire starter. With the carbon steel knives, you can probably strike it against the back of the blade to create the sparks you'll want and if not (like with some of the coated ones) you'll be carrying the striker anyway.

For sharpening, you'll want to get a decent sharpening setup and start stropping. A couple of easy sharpening systems would be the superior Spyderco Sharpermaker (usually available on Amazon around the $50 mark) or the Lansky Sharpening system which while cheaper isn't as good. You could take the time to learn how to free hand it, but most casual users don't care that much because it takes a long time to get proficient at freehand sharpening. Stropping is running the blade against something like smooth leather (usually smooth leather, actually) to remove burrs along the blade of a knife made by use and sharpening and the restore a blade to a better edge without removing metal. Stropping allows for a level of sharpness unachievable by sharpening alone and extends a knife's lifetime by allowing sharpness to be achieved for longer without removing metal from the blade. To learn how to strop, watch videos on YouTube or check out guides from the sidebar of /r/knives.

Finally, if you want a whistle, just carry a whistle. If you want a mirror for signaling, carry a small signaling mirror or mirror polish the knife you buy (a process where you sand the blade with increasing grit level sandpaper until it shines like the sun and you can see yourself in the blade).

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

u/Ropeless · 2 pointsr/knives

Condor bush lore fits the bill as well.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002CC6BPM

u/Dank_Monkey · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002CC6BPM/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_7?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

This or the swamp romper is probably a good starting point. Invest in a good sharpening kit (Lansky) I promise it will make a huge difference, especially for cooking. Even the nicest knife isn't worth a damn when it gets dull.

u/ALeapAtTheWheel · 2 pointsr/knives

This answer assumes 1) you want a few knives to cover different uses and 2) you can dig in the couch cushions for $3.53 or you can wait for Amazon's prices to fluctuate just a little bit. The price on the Kershaw jumped $3 just while I am typing this up...

EDC: Kershaw Blur, $54.17. I'm a little goofy, and I like the serrated tanto even though it looks like ass. I assume for most people, they'd prefer the straight blade. I've had one for a few years, and it works great. Just the right size, comfortable grippy handle, and I love the opening mechanism.

Camping knife: Condor Tool and Knife Bushlore 4.375-Inch Drop Point Blade, $36.41. The QA on fit and finish is apparently an issue with this company, but I didn't notice any problem on mine. It's not going to win a beauty competition, but its a hard worker. One of the comments on Amazon says it's the AK-47 of the knife world. I'm inclined to agree.

Inconspicuous Folder: Opinel #8, $12.95. I don't actually own one of these, so caveat emptor, but they come highly recommended by the hive mind. It's a classy looking folder that you could carry around in your suit's jacket pocket or your briefcase.

u/rossbw · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

http://www.amazon.com/Condor-Bushlore-4-375-Inch-Walnut-Leather/dp/B002CC6BPM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1449015699&sr=8-1&keywords=condor+bushlore
the condor bushlore is by far my favorite knife. thats after moras, ka bars, opinels, and esee. condor is the way to go imo

u/JimmyRnj · 2 pointsr/knifeclub

Condor Bushlore
It does have a bit of a micro-bevel but that can easily be sharpened out to a zero grind Scandi.

u/gdawggydog · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

Is this the one you have?

Condor Tool & Knife, Bushlore Camp Knife, 4-5/16in Blade, Hardwood Handle with Sheath https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002CC6BPM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_XxGXDbEGH9XNT

u/Captain_Poontamer · 2 pointsr/worldnews

My knife was made in El Salvador, it's high grade carbon steel.

u/billbillbilly · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

You gotta be more specific in your original questions buddy.

First of all, there are 2 reasons to remove an animal from a trap. To rescue (and minimize harm to the animal), or to harvest (and minimize damage to the trap). Here in bushcrafter land, I wouldn't usually assume you aren't planning on eating what was caught in the trap.....

It does sound like you are looking for the rescue side of things, and this is for a film, and you are looking for realism..

A swiss army knife or basic folding pocketknife are fairly realistic options for what a typical person might have with them with just a general plan of being 'prepared'. Something like 4-5inch Condor Bushlore is a decent approximation for what a more bushcraft oriented person might have with them in a wilderness setting. Someone who is going out intentionally to rescue animals from traps though, that is an entirely different question! For that you'd want a blunt tip, the type found in rescue knives, and/or EMT scissors.

For realism, most of us here know enough about the various types of knife that we could likely give you good answers - but you really should explain what kind of realism you are actually going for.

Average outdoorsy person with basic 'preparedness' is likely to have something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-Army-Huntsman-Leather/dp/B000IOI0NC/

Or this:

https://www.amazon.com/Gerber-Spine-Fixed-Blade-Camping/dp/B07DDCG3HD

Average Joe who has no idea of what makes a knife good or useful is likely to have something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Tac-Force-Police-Assisted-Tactical-Rescue/dp/B01LZ0T3N9



Average bushcraft subreddit user probably has something similar to:

https://www.amazon.com/Condor-Tool-Knife-Bushlore-Hardwood/dp/B002CC6BPM

but wishes they had:

https://www.amazon.com/Benchmade-162-Bushcrafter-Drop-Point/dp/B00B0E1MB6

Someone going out with them intention of rescuing persons or animals would probably be carrying something like this though:

https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Rescue-Tool-Pocket-Fluorescent/dp/B000PX0LKG

https://www.amazon.com/Spyderco-Assist-Orange-Handle-Rescue/dp/B0012G6KI2

https://www.amazon.com/LEATHERMAN-832590-Raptor-Shears/dp/B07N6P2RCB

https://www.amazon.com/DGX-Titanium-Coated-Stainless-Shears/dp/B01B2YF0AM

And then finally, I'll say this - pretty much anything sharper than a butter knife can be used to safely rescue an animal from most situations. Hell I could probably do it with a can opener or nail clippers. So just decide what sort of situation you expect your characters to have intentionally been prepared for, and go from there.

https://www.amazon.com/GI-P-38-Can-Opener-5-pack/dp/B005EAIXAU

u/king_human · 2 pointsr/knifeclub

Here are some options:

Ka-Bar:

Mark 1 Kraton handle

BK5

Neck Knife

Condor:

Bushcraft Basic

Kephart Knife

Bushlore

Basically-a-Mora-options:

Hultafors Heavy Duty

Cold Steel Finn Hawk

Ka-Bar's 1095 is pretty damn good. The Magnum Camp Knife is bigger than you were looking for, but it's a solid value. Condor knives are very high value, but can be rough around the edges. The Hultafors and Cold Steel knives I linked are stainless, but should do well in a kayak. All these knifes will take a beating and should be useful for a wide variety of tasks (some better than others, of course, but I wanted to offer a wide selection of size, shape, and grind).

u/bellzor · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

Condor Bushlore is a great knife and it's cheaper than the Gerber. I started with a Mora but I like the Beefier Bushlore and it comes with a nice leather sheath. Only problem is I didn't like the edge on it so I had to do some work getting it sharp the way I like it. I didn't mind cause I enjoy sharpening my knives.
http://www.amazon.com/Condor-Bushlore-4-375-Inch-Walnut-Leather/dp/B002CC6BPM

u/TThrowawayaccount56 · 1 pointr/Bushcraft

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002CC6BPM/ref=pd_aw_lpo_200_tr_img_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=GR55ZR4H7T6DHD4B2NBN
Love this knife, great craftsmanship and just feels nice. Totally worth the 55$. Just keep the blade clean and wipe off any debris (it's best to oil it).

u/GabberMate · 1 pointr/camping

I have a Mora and a Condor Bushlore. The Mora is a light, fixed knife for general use, though the blade isn't very thick. The flat grind (scandi?) is very easy to sharpen, and you can get it in stainless or carbon steel. The Bushlore is for funsies. I like throwing it, and it was very cheap for such a robust, high carbon knife. Heavy as all get-out, though.

Edit: Link to Amazon for Bushlore, since Mora was already linked.

u/Therightmike · 1 pointr/knifeclub

My fav low cost camp knife Condor Bushlore. The knife is awesome and the leather sheath rivals knives that cost 3x the money.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002CC6BPM?pc_redir=1404826492&robot_redir=1

u/JimmyBiscuit · 1 pointr/EDC

If you want a fixed knife beware of this:

  1. Below 12cm

  2. No Tanto style blade

    If you mean by Condor Bushknife something like this: https://www.amazon.de/Condor-60004-Bushlore-Knife/dp/B002CC6BPM/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1481920914&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=Condor+bushknife

    This is be legal to carry and own and won't be taken from you without special circumstances.Strictly speaking, the knife OP uses is also legal but some features are in a gray zone.
u/CaptainTheGabe · 1 pointr/Survival

I love my small forest axe. Best survival purchase i've made. I wouldn't stray from that idea, unless you decide to refurbish an antique hatchet. I've seen people fix up sixty year old plumb scout hatchets to gransfors quality.

For knives, i use my moraknive survival and the condor bushlore. The bushlore a hardy-ass knife and it's only about thirty bucks. I use the mora regularly. That particular one is what i have, i picked it up based on the thickness of the blade, but they have far cheaper ones if you don't want to throw down that much. I believe you can get an almost identicle knife without the firesteel for around 15 bucks cheaper.
Good Review on the bushlore

Machete-wise, i love my Condor Parang. It's giant, it sharpens well, it holds an edge, and it's tough as nails. The thing is 1/4 inch thick. It's big. It also comes with a sexy leather sheath of equally high quality and durability.
I've also played around with the full size bear grylls Parang by gerber. Thing cuts like you wouldn't believe, with great weight length and balance. I use the condor, my survival bud uses the gerber. They're about equal in different ways.

u/stealthybadger · 1 pointr/knives

I was in a similar spot recently, I went for a Condor Bushlore, though it's on the shorter end, though it all depends on what you're looking for. The Becker Bk-14 is another option, and a cheaper alternative to the Izula-II

Bushlore

Becker

u/BackdoorAlex2 · 1 pointr/Survival

Surprised it hasn't been mentioned. I recommend the Condor Bushlore
https://www.amazon.com/Condor-CTK232-4-3HC-Walnut-Bushlore-Knife/dp/B002CC6BPM

u/shroom_throwaway9722 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

The Condor Bushlore is a great inexpensive knife. Carbon steel, full tang, etc. The old ones were not that great but there have been many improvements so the new ones are a fantastic value. You can baton firewood with it all day long. Get a knife pro to put a Scandi grind on it and you'll be set for a long time.

Secondly, get a set of Japanese water stones and learn how to use them.

Even the most expensive unobtanium-carbon quantum hattori hanzo japanese nanosteel knife can be ruined by improper maintenance (e.g. pull-through carbide blade destroyers).

Start with 1000 grit. You can also get 800 grit for fixing chips and other damage. The K-80 is a good starter set. If you want to sharpen your kitchen knives 'shaving sharp' then pick up an additional 4000/6000 grit stone for fine polishing.

Search /r/bushcraft for further knife and sharpening advice.

u/weedeater64 · 1 pointr/Survival

This will meet and exceed your needs.

u/patrickeg · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

I'll remember that for next time. I've already packed it all away, but I might drag it out and take some pics. My foot is pretty banged up so it'll be a minute. But Ill give you a short list :)

Pack: Osprey Exos 58

Sleeping Bag: Teton Sports Tracker

Tent: ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1

Tarp: Ultimate Survival Hex tarp

Mess kit: Mess kit and Mug

Water Filtration: Sawyer Mini

Tools/Defense: Note: Normally I would only take one knife, but I wasn't sure which I would prefer as they're two quite different blades. Ka-Bar Becker BK2, Condor Bushlore, and Bear Spray

Stove: MSR PocketRocket

First Aid: I had the Adventure Medical Kits Day Tripper, and then added to that with Celox and an Israeli Bandage

Trekking Poles: Cascade Mountain Tech CF with Cork Grips

In addition I had a few little things in a small kit; Ferro rod, duct tape, trail blazes, chemical water purifiers in case my Sawyer failed, bug spray, a small thing of sunscreen (which I didn't end up needing as it was overcast), deodorant, TP, etc.

u/blzd4dyz · 1 pointr/knives

The Condor Bushlore is an inexpensive option, and weighs about 12.3oz. If you're planning on batoning wood with your knife, you'll want it thick enough to withstand the force, and long enough to be able to hit the tip-side of the spine poking out from the other side of the log. Since your budget is a lot higher than that, you might want to shop around for something higher-quality.

Check out the Blind Horse Bushcrafter or Woodsman. Not sure what they weigh, but I'd be happy to lug around the extra weight of one of those beauties.

EDIT: Also note that O1 tool steel rusts very easily. Be prepared to maintain those blades quite a bit. It's very tough, though, and decently easy to sharpen. I read somewhere that, when polled, most knifemakers would choose O1 for their personal blades. It's the same steel as in the Ray Mears Woodlore knife.