Reddit Reddit reviews Hurricane Turning Tools, Woodturning Bowl Gouge, High Speed Steel, 1/2 Inches Flute (5/8 Inches Bar Stock)

We found 4 Reddit comments about Hurricane Turning Tools, Woodturning Bowl Gouge, High Speed Steel, 1/2 Inches Flute (5/8 Inches Bar Stock). Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Lathe Turning Tools
Power Lathe Parts & Accessories
Power Tool Parts & Accessories
Power & Hand Tools
Tools & Home Improvement
Hurricane Turning Tools, Woodturning Bowl Gouge, High Speed Steel, 1/2 Inches Flute (5/8 Inches Bar Stock)
1/2" Bowl Gouge, (5/8" Bar Stock)16" Ash HandleMade from High Speed Steel (HSS), Last up to 8X longer than Carbon Steel
Check price on Amazon

4 Reddit comments about Hurricane Turning Tools, Woodturning Bowl Gouge, High Speed Steel, 1/2 Inches Flute (5/8 Inches Bar Stock):

u/tigermaple · 5 pointsr/turning

I hope you aren't really turned off bowl work, this is damn solid for a first go. The form is a lot better than most, and in particular, the rim is crisp and defined instead of the "wishy-washy rounded-over, couldn't decide what to do with it" treatment I see on a lot of beginner bowls, often months or years after the person began turning.

Some tips:

  1. Get a bowl gouge. The Hurricane line is pretty inexpensive and reportedly good for the money. It won't hold an edge as long as the better Sheffield brands, but it's half the cost of them and will be a huge step up from HF tools.

  2. Get a much-heavier duty round nose scraper. Again, Hurricane is a good value. I've seen that HF round scraper in the set and it is too small and weak for much bowl turning.

  3. On tenon formation for holding the bowl in the chuck: A lot of people don't realize that the bearing surface for the top of the jaws is actually the most important part, and what will often make the difference between a tenon that holds and one that does not. A photo of mine illustrating what I mean and another of what a good tenon looks like in the chuck

    Finally, check your area for a woodturning club. I'm not saying you can't learn exclusively through reading and watching videos, because you can, but this is definitely one of those things were some in-person instruction in the beginning goes a long way. Here's a link you can use to check for a local chapter of the American Association of Woodturners
u/Incrarulez · 5 pointsr/turning

Save it for later.

Gain proficiency on sacrificial pieces first.

I used this starting out:

https://www.amazon.com/Hurricane-Turning-Tools-Woodturning-Inches/dp/B008AVM7W0

For that depth you can likely use a 3/8" bowl gouge instead of 1/2".

u/Matt2979 · 2 pointsr/turning

I have a mix of Robert Sorby and PSI tools. I've only had my lathe less than 2 months, and my sharpening jig/grinder for less than a couple weeks. I've gotten a lot better at sharpening, but for now, I cannot tell a huge difference between the tools. I'm sure that will change as I get a lot better with them. I'm definitely less worried about over sharpening the cheaper ones (grinding them down faster) so they are helping me to get more practice for getting a good, consistent bevel.

I've also got this bowl gouge on the way.

u/wassmatta · 1 pointr/turning

I use this hurricane one and it's great.