Reddit Reddit reviews It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health (The Family Library)

We found 38 Reddit comments about It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health (The Family Library). Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health (The Family Library)
It s Perfectly Normal Changing Bodies Growing Up Sex and Sexual Health The Family Library
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38 Reddit comments about It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health (The Family Library):

u/Onmymind42 · 142 pointsr/sex

Sounds like a good talk. I have a ten year old son, so I followed your post with interest. Kids are curious and it can be hard to balance their curiosity with Internet safety. At least when we were kids, we could sneak peeks at bodies in National Geographic and there was no worry about the FBI knocking down our doors! Anyway, I bought that sane book for my son along with this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0763668729/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1450641405&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=its+perfectly+normal&dpPl=1&dpID=61eSz7BpJlL&ref=plSrch. He acted all embarrassed but he has them if he wants to read them. They get the "puberty" talk at school this year, so maybe he will pull the books out then. We will see!

u/rebelkitty · 112 pointsr/Parenting

Since the boys are roughly the same age and evidently having a good time, I think you're right that you don't have to worry about coercion or abuse.

However, your son is clearly ready to learn about more than just "where babies come from" and "some families have two daddies". He's started puberty. You need to teach him about the feelings he's having, and the changes his body is going through. And you need to talk to him about sex and its place in society. The way we view male and female roles. Concepts of consent. Privacy. Respect. Legal issues. STIs. How we feel about children and sex. Sexting. Why masturbation is usually a better choice when you're very young, versus involving other people in your sexual explorations and discoveries. Sexual orientation and the assumptions different elements of our society makes about it. (By the way, just because he was experimenting with his same-gender friend, that doesn't mean he's gay. He may be, he may not be. It may be still too early to know.)

Eleven year olds are pretty darn smart. He's more than capable of understanding this stuff. And it's not going to cost him his innocence... innocence is not the same as ignorance. Innocence is merely a lack of jadedness about the world.

So educate him!

This book is a great place to start:

http://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Normal-Changing-Growing/dp/0763668729/

Edit: Discuss it with his father first, but I do think you could tactfully mention what you saw to your son. And use that as a jumping off point for further discussion. It's perfectly okay to say, "I don't want you doing anything sexual with M. Let's think of some other fun things you can do with your best friend instead..." And it's also okay to put an end to the whole, "sleeping together in bed/same room unsupervised thing". Same as you would with a boy and girl who are getting a wee bit too frisky with each other. It's your home, and you set the rules.

u/sylverbound · 80 pointsr/TrollXChromosomes

Factual information is never too much information at any age. A few book resources that could help follow:

It's Perfectly Normal

The Care and Keeping of You (there's also a second one)

This whole list with more

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Also just keep in mind, honesty and accuracy are the most important things at this stage. If she's old enough to ask, she's old enough to be told at least some factual information about it. Obviously not explicit sexual stuff needed, but address anatomy, facts of reproduction, issues of consent, body image and body changes, etc. These are all appropriate when the child is already asking about things.

u/flakingnapstich · 37 pointsr/badwomensanatomy

I strongly recommend you send her a copy of "It's Perfectly Normal" by Robie H. Harris.

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> The definitive book about puberty and sexual health for today’s kids and teens, now fully updated for its twentieth anniversary.

>
>For two decades, this universally acclaimed book on sexuality has been the most trusted and accessible resource for kids, parents, teachers, librarians, and anyone else who cares about the well-being of tweens and teens. Now, in honor of its anniversary, It’s Perfectly Normal has been updated with information on subjects such as safe and savvy Internet use, gender identity, emergency contraception, and more. Providing accurate and up-to-date answers to nearly every imaginable question, from conception and puberty to birth control and STDs, It’s Perfectly Normal offers young people the information they need—now more than ever—to make responsible decisions and stay healthy.

​

u/Brentonclt · 12 pointsr/NoStupidQuestions

My parents talked to me but also gave me a book that was really great.

It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health (The Family Library) https://www.amazon.com/dp/0763668729/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_pS3QzbS1TWRN3

I suggest to buy this. I see there is a Kindle version now too so that's cool. This book goes over every from anatomy, what to expect in puberty, types of safe sex practices, STDs, emotional concerns of going through puberty. It was really a good resource.

P.S The uterus is about the size of a pear but stretches during pregnancy. Testicles should be descended in most boys by birth. Talking about balls dropping is usually teasing kids starting puberty or when the voice deepens. Chlamydia and syphilis are powerful bacterial infections that are becoming antibiotic resistant but are curable. HPV causes genital warts and is mostly incurable but recently there is a vaccination that most women are recommended to get so request that from you doctor if you want. HPV tends to cause uterine cancer. HIV is also incurable and can lead to AIDS. Nuvaring puts progesterone in your body which, to paraphrase, make your body think it's pregnant so it prevents ovulation, similar to all other female birth control drugs. The Nuvaring is flexible and springy so it sits at the cervix, at the end of the vagina, at the opening of the uterus. The man's penis does need to be erect before putting on the condom otherwise it's will not fit right and could come off in sex.

u/beethovensnowman · 10 pointsr/sex

I recently went through the something like this... But with my eight year old. I was stunned. Mortified. I found searches like, "8 year olds having sex," "naked 8 year olds," etc. He was introduced to online porn through an eleven year old family friend/cousin over the summer. I bought a book that is more geared to tweens, but we went through it and had THE talk.


I explained to him that ONE - if he wanted to talk about sex, he needed to talk to a trusted adult, like his father or me, an aunt or uncle. Talking with other kids, even older ones like this eleven year old cousin, isn't going to get him anywhere because they probably haven't had sex. They won't know what real sex is like between real people that are having it.

TWO - looking up porn on line isn't always going to be REAL SEX. In fact, is mostly not real sex. The people who are filming and putting their sexual acts online are actors and are not showing what real sex can be between real people when you're really having sex.

TWO B - you can't trust all the stuff that's posted online. Some people put stuff online without permission, and that can be illegal. Also, anything involving children or even a teenager under 18 in a sexual act or being naked is ILLEGAL. You don't know with 100% certainty who is over a certain age or what was posted or filmed with permission. Because of that, it's important to not search for pornography or naked photos online, especially at his age or of people of his age.

He took it pretty well, albeit he was very nervous and embarrassed and extremely ashamed. I told him he wasn't at fault, because he didn't know better, but now he does. And just because he knows about this stuff doesn't give him the right to talk to ANY OTHER KIDS about it. I told him that if talk happens (especially among little boys his age and in the coming years) that it's best to let them know that he already knows about it and he already talked about it with his mom, and that his friends should do the same if they are curious. I told him that parents are very protective of what their kids know and don't know when it comes to adult topics and that it's not our job or place to interfere with other families practices.

Here's the book if any one is interested: It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health (The Family Library) https://www.amazon.com/dp/0763668729/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_TkkDwb8HKXWK1

It really goes in detail about a lot of things - sexuality, birth control, puberty, masturbation. It wasn't exactly an easy read for a mom and son team, but we got through it! He even felt comfortable enough to tell me about crushes and a kiss he had during a field trip. Also comfortable enough to ask about my birth control methods (felt my nexlplanon implant) & questions when I'm on my period when he sees tampons in the trash - that little punk.

u/MadtownMaven · 9 pointsr/askwomenadvice

You can google "first period kits" and see what it's included in those and make one for her. It would just require a quick stop at the store and would be a nice gesture. Usually they are a small bag/purse with a few different types of pads/liners/tampons, a small bottle of ibuprofen, some new undies, and maybe something fun like a bottle of nail polish or some chocolate. A heating pad is also nice. If you are also concerned with the messaging from your wife, go on amazon and get a book, something like this, that's specifically about puberty and starting her cycle. Or send her a link to a website geared towards that.

u/wanderer333 · 7 pointsr/Parenting

Get him a book and discuss it together. Note the second half of that sentence - this doesn't get you off the hook from talking to him, but gives you a place to start and some idea of age-appropriate language. It's Perfectly Normal is widely recognized as one of the best sex ed books out there (and does cover masturbation); if you want something for boys specifically, you could try the Boy's Guide to Becoming a Teen or The Body Book for Boys (not completely sure if they both cover masturbation so you might want to read some reviews first).

Having said that, I'm wondering why Mom wants you to be the one to have this conversation in the first place? Do you have a relationship with him such that he would feel comfortable talking about such personal stuff with you? Otherwise I would probably suggest that she bring it up with him first, and then you can mention that if he has any questions he'd feel more comfortable asking another guy, that you'd be happy to chat with him too.

u/VampDuc · 7 pointsr/TwoXChromosomes

Adding to the above, my parents bought me It's Perfectly Normal when I was young.

It's not gender-specific and explores sexuality and reproduction in a prepubescent-friendly way. The language is plain and clear and doesn't talk down about its subject matter.

I really can't recommend this book enough.

u/CrazyAtWar · 6 pointsr/Parenting

Maybe not what you are looking for exactly but another good one:

It's Perfectly Normal
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0763668729/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/_Keep_on_Keeping_on_ · 6 pointsr/stepparents

Can I add another book recommendation? We gave a book called It's perfectly normal to SS around the time he was 12. DH have him an overview on what it was about and said he can flip through it, do some reading and feel free to discuss anything. This book literally covers everything you can imagine. I wish I had something like this when I was growing up honestly because I had a lot of questions. Sue Johanson (from the Sunday night sex show) was my guide when I was in high school, that sassy no bullshit old lady is the bomb!

u/andyflip · 6 pointsr/AskTrollX

(after following /u/whyihatepink's advice) If you'd rather go the book route, we got the version of this for young kids (5ish) and it was great.

u/WaffleFoxes · 5 pointsr/stepparents

I highly recommend the book Its Perfectly Normal for kids in this age range. It will answer questions you hadn't even thought she might have.

u/peace-monger · 5 pointsr/Parenting

That book is meant for younger kids, but there are two additional books written by the same authors aimed at older kids It's so amazing! for 7-10 year olds, and It's perfectly normal for 10 and up.

u/oooooh_kay · 5 pointsr/exmormon

I got my daughters 2 books - they're for different age ranges but they introduce "the birds and the bees" well (with a silly cartoon bird and bee, who have different interest and comfort levels with discussing everything).

It's So Amazing (recommended for ages 7-10) and It's Perfectly Normal (for ages 10 and up)

u/marywaterdragon · 5 pointsr/bisexual

I did that to my parents, too. I remember asking my mother how she masturbates, and that's when she finally said, "No, that's too personal."

Here is a book that helped me so much as a 4th grader, that I got the new edition for my 10-year-old niece: https://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Normal-Changing-Growing/dp/0763668729/ref=dp_ob_title_bk

(I also got the 4yo version for my toddler! It comes in handy when he wants to learn about my vulva. "Well, honey, we aren't gonna look at mommy's, but there are drawings in your book, let's go look at those.")

If you don't provide the right knowledge, someone else will provide the wrong knowledge. Your child is lucky to have you. <3

u/[deleted] · 4 pointsr/Parenting

At that age, the book my parents read with me was called "It's Perfectly Normal". It's a great book for younger kids that covers the basics of puberty and sex. (Just a heads up, it includes a section about gay people and bisexual people, and is very LGBT positive, just in case that's not something you're comfortable telling your kids.) It explains crushes, what sexual attraction feels like, the basics of how sex works.

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When she is a few years older (13-14), one of the best books you can get her (and read yourself, before you give to her) is called Our Bodies, Ourselves. It covers A LOT of stuff, in detail. It covers everything from the puberty basics, to what it means to take care of our bodies including drugs and alcohol, sexual health, safe sex, and mental health and wellbeing. It is an incredible guide to womens health. Heads up that this one covers some hard topics, including sexual violence and unwanted pregnancy/abortion. Personally I believe it's good to learn about these things early, but you may feel differently.

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Amazon links to each:

https://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Normal-Changing-Growing/dp/0763668729/ref=sr_1_2?crid=ZU9INC4R8RPF&keywords=it%27s+perfectly+normal&qid=1565136853&s=books&sprefix=it%27s+perfect%2Cstripbooks%2C230&sr=1-2

https://www.amazon.com/Our-Bodies-Ourselves-New-Era/dp/0743256115/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_img_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=TS7545ED92NZNFAWYDCQ

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Some things I was told that helped me growing up: you don't have to wait until marriage for sex, but your first time will be much better if you wait to have it with someone you trust. Someone you trust means someone who you have known for a long time, who has demonstrated to you in concrete ways that they care about you and your safety and well-being, who listens to you. It means someone who you can have really open conversations with, even uncomfortable ones. If you feel too awkward to talk about safe sex and how to prevent pregnancy, and what to do in case of an accidental pregnancy, you don't know the person well enough to have sex with them.

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Try to foster the kind of relationship with her where she will come to you with questions or if she's in trouble. "I expect you to wait until marriage", or "I will hunt down any guy who hurts you with a shotgun", or "sex is dirty and for adults" will not foster that kind of relationship, even if it is REALLY tempting.

​

Let her know if she wants to be put on birth control, you will take her to get it.

u/Copterwaffle · 4 pointsr/fosterit

Honestly, maybe just talk to him about it being natural to want to look at porn (as you have) but also explain that it's very rude to do it on other people's devices and explain the issues of viruses/pop-ups. Then I'd have a quick talk about how porn portrays sex being unrealistic/respecting women and partners etc., and just tell him if he wants to look at porn it's fine but he should keep that all in mind and do it in private and only go to trusted websites (maybe show him a few, explain that he should never actively download anything, that he should use adblockers, that he should never give out a phone number or credit card numbers to access porn as that will charge money).

I think that it would be okay to change your phone password (and tell him you are doing that so he is not tempted to use someone elses' phone again) but adding locks on your doors and cameras seems really extreme and to me sends the message that you don't trust him to modify his behavior or control himself. It also seems like an invasion of his privacy and not the right way to send a message about respecting others' privacy. Would you have liked to know that your parents used cameras to watch you? A white noise machine seems ideal if you want to keep your sex quieter, though. Honestly, I grew up in a small house and had to hear my parents have sex, so he might be hearing it whether he wants to or not.

A few mags might be okay, but maybe he should just have the chance to have some private internet time now and again on a device that has good anti-virus software. You can teach him how to clear his browser history or use incognito mode as well to protect his own privacy. Also, maybe he is into men and doesn't want to look at female models, and if that's the case, giving him those mags will alienate him further. If he has some free reign to find his own porn then you avoid that.

The author Robie Harris has some GREAT books that vary by developmental stage that address sexual health and reproduction issues; I believe "It's Perfectly Normal" is the one that addresses masturbation in a really healthy way.

u/ozyman · 3 pointsr/raisingkids

Sounds to me like you handled it well. Does she have any "appropriate" sources to consult when she is curious? Our daughter has these books:

u/lavender_ · 3 pointsr/actuallesbians

I don’t have sex talk advice since I’m not a mom and I teach younger kids. But I would have liked to know happy gay adults existed when I was a kid. Maybe you could expose her to kid friendly gay media like Steven Universe or She-Ra (I hear it’s pretty gay but haven’t actually watched it).

I also googled gay books for kids and this one looks cute AF.

There are people super upset about this one’s “vulgar” pictures and the fact that the author is gay so it might be good.

u/cbpiz · 3 pointsr/Parenting

Buy "It's Perfectly Normal." Used it for my son who is now 28 and my daughter who is 17. My son recently brought it up and said he wanted to know the name so he could use it for his own kids when its time. We went through it together when they were nine or ten. It addresses everything from menstruation to puberty to different body types to conception to homosexuality to masturbation to abortion. It is all done in a matter of fact way with (of course) a bird and bee cartoon commenting on each page to make it kid friendly. I can't recommend it enough. http://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Normal-Changing-Growing/dp/0763668729/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1463671727&sr=8-1&keywords=its+perfectly++normal

u/ChiperSoft · 3 pointsr/TrueReddit

Amazon link for those like me interested in buying it: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0763668729

This book sounds awesome.

u/dustgirl · 2 pointsr/Parenting

This is the best book I think:

Its Perfectly Normal

u/JustDiscoveredSex · 2 pointsr/TwoXChromosomes

The hell we shouldn’t give young kids the whole talk. I was giving the other kids in kindergarten sex Ed lessons. That’s what happens when you live on a farm...animals fuck, it’s unavoidably in your face. I had the mechanics down very early. And so did my kids.

Books to normalize talking about sex:

It's Not the Stork!: A Book About Girls, Boys, Babies, Bodies, Families and Friends (age 4+)

https://www.amazon.com/Its-Not-Stork-Families-Friends/dp/0763633313

It's So Amazing!: A Book about Eggs, Sperm, Birth, Babies, and Families (age 7+)

https://www.amazon.com/Its-So-Amazing-Families-Library/dp/0763668745

It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sexual Health (age 9+)

https://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Normal-Changing-Growing/dp/0763668729

u/theknack4 · 2 pointsr/lgbt

Here's a good book to start with.

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https://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Normal-Changing-Growing/dp/0763668729

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We use it in the curriculum that I teach in school. It's part of the Our Whole Lives (OWL) curriculum if you want to dig deeper on your own.

u/jmurphy42 · 1 pointr/Parenting

This is a great book to jump start a discussion. He's at a really good age to start the conversation.

u/SiriusPurple · 1 pointr/Parenting

The Robie Harris books are awesome. There’s one for younger kids (kindergarten-grade 2 or so,)one for slightly older kids, and one for preteens. My kids love them.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0763668729/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_0763668729

u/a_lost_swarm_appears · 1 pointr/AskMen

First off - don't be quiet around your baby when she's sleeping!! Let her get used to the noise, then she'll sleep through anything!!. That's one of the best pieces of advice I got. :-)
Think back to the stuff you loved doing as a child and remember to try that when she's old enough. I've had great success with my son doing that. One of my favourite memories is buying a big bag of those plastic army toys, you know the cheap plastic ones? you get a couple of tanks and jeeps and a load of soldiers. Started playing with those with my son when he was 3 or 4 ish, man that was so, so much fun. Usually some teddy godzilla would come in in the end and destroy both sides. Then we modernised it a bit by filming little stories on my phone and using special effects apps to blow things up. He loved that!!

Ask her questions, I get a great kick out of that. Specifically, when she asks you about something, ask her what she thinks, it's a great way to connect with your kid and get an insight to how her mind works, it'll also help her develop a questioning/reasoning mindset, for example: "Pappa, why is the sky blue?", "I'm not sure, why do you think it's blue?" - You won't believe the answers you'll get, it's so great. Then explain how it actually works, and if you don't know, get her to a computer and start googling that shit.
While she's small, let your kid get dirty. I mean seriously, playing in mud, jumping in puddles, eating dinner or ice-cream with her hands - the bigger the mess the better.

Minecraft - Play Minecraft!!
On a more serious note, start teaching your kid the very basics of sex education when she's about 7 or 8, seriously, any later than that is getting old. My son is 10 now and I got him this book. But you don't want her growing up not knowing, I hear people saying 12 or 13 is the time to talk about that stuff, but that's way, way too late. if you start with the basics at 7 or 8 then by the time she's 10 she'll be comfortable enough with the topic to be able to come to you and her mother with questions. You can get a book like that and read it with her.


Outdoor stuff - do outdoor stuff. Forests, beaches, join clubs together, scouting, fishing, things like that. We joined an orienteering club together, man that's so much fun.

Man, kids are awesome, have fun!

Edit: Hugs - never ending hugs!
Edit 2: Cooking, don't forget to cook with her.

u/Pheran_Reddit · 1 pointr/sex

You may want to get your daughter an educational book such as It's Perfectly Normal that you can either read with her or she can read on her own, whichever makes the two of you more comfortable.

u/MableXeno · 1 pointr/Parenting

Get a basic book. Maybe something like this? And maybe a book about consent.

u/Esteesmithrowaway · 1 pointr/sexover30
u/FightinJayhawk · 1 pointr/exmormon

This book is a really good sex education text for teens and it covers masturbation and other sex-relations issues relevant to teens. We found it very helpful. A child psychologist I know recommended it very highly. https://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Normal-Changing-Growing/dp/0763668729/ref=pd_bxgy_14_img_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=A870ETNQKQ9VC016SEPT

u/paasaaplease · 1 pointr/exmormon

I think you need a trusted source for basic Sex Ed, that you probably missed. A source that you can go back and reference.

Some really good Sex Ed books, with lots of pictures/comics, (which are for teens, but I think they're really good) are written by Robie H. Harris. You can get them on Amazon.com:

  • It's Perfectly Normal
  • It's So Amazing!
  • It's Not the Stork!

    Maybe you can find them at your local library?

    Other than that, I honestly learned a lot from good internet sources and wikipedia. Learn to think critically about what is a good source of information. Plus, you can always ask your family doctor or gynecologist; and therapy is a great idea too.