Reddit Reddit reviews Klymit Insulated Static V Sleeping Pad, Orange/Char Black

We found 28 Reddit comments about Klymit Insulated Static V Sleeping Pad, Orange/Char Black. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Klymit Insulated Static V Sleeping Pad, Orange/Char Black
4 SEASON BACKCOUNTRY CAMPING PAD: Lightweight insulated air mattress with Klymalite insulation to keep you warm when its cold out; R-Value of 4.4SLEEP COMFORTABLY ALL NIGHT LONG: Features an innovative v-chamber design and synthetic insulation which limits air movement and heat lossINCREDIBLY LIGHTWEIGHT (25 Ounces) and PACKS SMALL to 5 x 8 InchesINFLATED SIZE: 72 x 23 x 2.5 Inches; 10-15 breaths. Body Mapping Technology- Our patented V-shaped design delivers support and comfort no matter how you sleep – on your side, stomach or backINCLUDES: Stuff Sack, Patch Kit, and, it includes a limited Lifetime Warranty
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28 Reddit comments about Klymit Insulated Static V Sleeping Pad, Orange/Char Black:

u/theinfamousj · 103 pointsr/AskWomen

So, I just went through my Amazon orders and pretty much every single thing I saw that I bought for myself I thought was the best thing I ever purchased.

With great pain and strain, I narrowed it down to these three things:

  • Inflatable Japanese Soaking Tub // I've always desired a deep bathtub that is in the Japanese soaking tub style. I had dreams of remodeling my bathroom to put in such a bathtub but when I priced it out the price tag had a lot of figures and made me very nervous. This device packs up to the size of two furled full size golf umbrellas side-by-side, but also fits into my existing bathtub and creates the soaking tub I so desire. Oh, and it cost under $100. Far less than a bathroom reno.

  • Klymit Static V Insulated // It truly is a super crazy comfortable sleeping pad/mat for side sleepers. I camp with a quilt, rather than a sleeping bag, but that hasn't been a problem.

  • ThermaRest Ultralight Cot Knock Off // At $40 vs $100+ for the name brand, but with the additional cost of 2 lbs, I am really happy with this cot. It is delightfully comfortable and I use it when traveling. I can sleep on my side without any sore spots developing.

    Edited to add links.
u/Runner5IsDead · 8 pointsr/CampingGear

Truth. I've backpacked for years with a $100 Kelty tent - heavy rains and wind no problem - and a $100 Marmot bag. Somewhere around 2005 it suddenly became easy to get good, cheap outdoor gear. It's not ultralight, but it's close enough.

The pad is a different story. Until recently you had to spend big to get something comfortable and reliable. Now that Thermarest has competition, prices have been halved. Our Klymits have lasted many nights outside with no problems, and I see great reviews for similar pads at half the price.

u/Satansbigsausage · 8 pointsr/CampingGear

There is a 4-season version that is also on sale today.

u/bsarocker · 6 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

the model you linked is not only super heavy, but I doubt would get you near comfortable. you will also need to pair either bag with matching r value ground insulation. for instance a pad like this
https://www.amazon.ca/KLYMIT-Insulated-Static-Camping-Orange/dp/B00ANRW7DI/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1494229667&sr=1-1&keywords=klymit+insulated+static+v THis is a huge mistake many people make. The ground insulation is paramount.

The model below is a better option.

https://www.amazon.ca/Sports-TrailHead-Ultralight-Sleeping-Orange/dp/B007JTLKCC/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1494229515&sr=1-1&keywords=teton+sleeping+bag

It's also better to NOT compress your bag. Line your pack with a trash compactor bag, push the sleeping bag into the bottom of your pack. Not in a stuff sack.

https://youtu.be/J1UZvwPnA_o

u/reddilada · 6 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I have a Klymit Insulated Static V. Was on sale for $45 on an Amazon deal of the day once so I picked it up. Pretty happy with it. Not sure what an additional 150 would bring to the table other than perhaps less weight or more insulation.

u/quarl0w · 5 pointsr/CampingGear

I'm doing my first camp in a long time next week with the scouts too. We are in Utah, but expect 30s overnight.

I am taking a cot, with an insulated sleeping pad, and a 0° bag. My son is fine in his 0° bag in a hammock, he's done a few at this temp without being too cold (even without an underquilt or pad).

I'm also a side sleeper, and feel too tight in mummy bags. I picked up a Teton Sports Polara bag, it was a little cheaper a month ago when I bought it. It's really nice. I tested it out with the cot and insulated pad, and it was very comfortable. It has a built in fleece liner that won't get all twisted because it clips and zips into the bag. They unzip fully, so you can get 2 and make a double bag. You can remove the fleece liner for warmer weather.

I will also be trying out an inflatable pillow for between my legs instead of a body pillow.

Check with your local REI store, see if they have a garage sale between now and the camp. You can get lots of stuff at about 70% off. I got my insulated stratus pad for $20 that's normally $100. Klymit makes a decent one that's well reviewed on Amazon and cheap.

Because I am rusty with camping, and getting involved with the local scouts, I will be camping more in the future, but have little to no supplies. I'm building my new supplies now. I have been reading a lot of Outdoor Gear Lab reviews, I like their reviews, they compare different brands instead of just reviewing one product at a time. That's what lead me to the Polara sleeping bag. They also usually have a budget pick.

u/jchance · 5 pointsr/CampingGear

FWIW, I am around 250 and 6'1" and I bought a Klymit Static V Insulated for less than $60 new and when I'm on my side my hip and shoulder don't touch the ground. Its R-Value is 4.4 vs 5 for the StoS, so real close. I have nothing bad to say about the Klymit air mattress- its sturdy, lightweight, and packs smaller than a water bottle. I even bought the non-insulated version for summer camping.

I absolutely love Sea to Summit stuff like dry sacs, pack covers, sleeping bag liners, and pillows, but I couldn't imagine spending that much on an air mattress when one half the price is fantastic.

u/canigetuhhhhhhhhhh · 4 pointsr/vandwellers

Hey! I was in that general are too up until recently. I'm no mold expert but I can only suggest my own setup, which may come across as a non-answer, but I don't sleep on a mattress: I sleep on an inflatable air mattress, like for hiking (this one specifically). Super minimalist but for whatever reason I feel comfier than on big real mattresses. I haven't had mold/mildew problems with that inflatable mattress, mainly because…there's no 'inside' really for the mold spores to cling to, and if it gets dirty it's super easy to disinfect the outside of and just wipe down.

If you're a big-bed sort of person, there are definitely bigger (like full-sized) inflatable mattress options out there. I also like mine because with limited space, I can roll it up and stow it every morning and basically have loads of floor space back

So that's an option

u/i-brute-force · 4 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

It seems to be $53 on Amazon and $60 for your link? Am I looking at a different one?

u/The-Dire-Wolf · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Probably not, unless you have something to insulate you from the ground. You need a sleeping pad, and not just a regular air mattress. Something that is specifically designed to keep you warm when sleeping on the cold ground. Sleeping pads are usually rated by an "r-value". The higher the "r-value", the warmer it should keep you. There are cheap foam pads to very expensive inflatable pads. Doesn't look like you're form the US, so I am not sure how hard it would be to get your hands on a Klymit Insulated Static V, but they're pretty affordable, comfortable, and warm. They're not great for backpacking but they are great for car camping.

u/maliciousone · 3 pointsr/Hammocks

> all this.. Can you link to a sleeping pad? I'm assuming its not the same thing as an air mattress.

This is what i currently use, Klymit Static V Insulated

But i have also used just a reflective sun shade for large trucks.

What is the weather and expected temps for where you are going.

u/zipzipzone · 3 pointsr/Mountaineering

Since weight isn't your biggest concern, I have a Klymit insulated static V and while not the lightest it's very reasonably priced compared to an Xtherm and comfortable at 2.5" thick. Currently going for $52 on Amazon, R value 4.4 and 25 oz, or the 'lite' version which is 19 oz and going for $75

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ANRW7DI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_kcBwyb9FMZQG5

u/alaskaj1 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Those are the poles, I actually edited my reply, perhaps while you were typing out yours.

I cant really say anything about the tent, you will have to trust the reviews. It still looks a bit heavy at almost 7lbs but with your budget I am not sure how much better you can do. You would need to bump up to probably close to $200 just for the tent. (For example: my wife and I took the marmot limelight 3 person tent out and it weighs in at just under 7lbs, I still felt it was really heavy splitting the cost.)

That sleeping bag has actually been debated recently. For the price it is hard to believe the claimed rating, there are concerns that it wont be warm enough. If you do go with that one you might want to try it out somewhere close to home/car first if you can.

I don't have a lot of experience with specific sleeping pads but the klymit static V insulated is a pretty popular budget option and has a 4.4 r value. It is currently $55. Its comfortable enough , my wife used that one when we went out.

If you happen to be near an REI check and see if they are having a members garage sale on December 1st, many locations are. They can have some huge discounts on gear, you just have to be careful before you buy as there are no returns. I got a 3.4lb 2 person tent for 60% off and the REI magma 10 sleeping bag for 50% off. The prices might be a little more than your current budget but you can really find some awesome prices on quality gear. If you aren't already a member it will be $20 to join (lifetime membership).

u/cwcoleman · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Klymit is the common recommendation for budget friendly inflatable sleeping pads. They come in a variety of sizes and warmth ratings.

u/doitskippy · 2 pointsr/motocamping

That you're camping in Australia reminded me of this recent post in which a blogger recommends this biker-focused swag tent. Seems to be a fair deal and while I have no experience with it the blogger reckons it's a good bit of kit as you Aussies might say ;-). Most likely you won't be borrowing your parent's tent. The car-camping type tents don't really get along well with motocamping. Sleeping bags and maybe the air mattress or sleeping pad are more likely, or a bit of cooking equipment. I'll throw out some random recommendations based on stuff I like and let you decide how it fits into your $500 =).

I find backpacking equipment seems to parallel motocamping equipment in many respects. You aren't as concerned about weight on the motorcycle, but you do need compact and reliable. You may want to consider a backpacker's inflatable sleeping pad, [this is the one I have] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ANRW7DI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1). It's no mattress but it insulates you from the ground which helps keep heat in, and it provides a bit of cushion too. It will fit inside the swag, a hammock, or any compact backpacking tent, and it packs up small. I have this tent which legitimately sleeps two as long as you don't mind being close (tested with my girlfriend) and should fit a twin sized inflatable mattress which would be substantially more comfortable than the camping pad I linked above. To make an addition to your luggage, I can't recommend a tank bag enough. I have this tank bag which is truly a bargain and should fit any motorcycle.

I would also check out Aerostich's Camping Section for some ideas. Being that you're in Australia I'm not sure if you want to buy directly from them unless you can't find an item anywhere but their website, but there are tons of ideas you can get from their store that you might not find other places.

Now I'll just list off several items I can think of that I like to pack for motocamping (most are small and multi-functional items, and a few specific get-my-ass-out-of-a-jam things):

Tire plug kit, some way to put air back in the tire (compact air compressor, CO2 cartridges, bicycle pump, etc), several feet of 550 cord (AKA paracord), extra bungee cords, extra cargo net, zip ties, electrician's tape, heavy-duty trash bags (maybe 3 or 5), a small supplement to my bike's OEM tool kit & a multitool, a first aid kit that includes bug bite relief (and anything else you might want specific to the area you're traveling), a sam splint & triangle bandage, a couple ways to start a fire (waterproof matches stored in a watertight container & a cigarette lighter usually), one or two of those mylar emergency blankets, a little mild dish soap.

You might not feel the need to carry all that on a 3 day trip but a lot of it is small, cheap, and multi-funcitonal. Trash bags are to keep trash under control at camp and emergency waterproofing for gear/people, so you want the thick ones.

u/Atyrius · 2 pointsr/beards

I use an insulated sleeping inflatable pad with a 0 degree mummy style sleeping bag. I slept in 30 degree weather snugged as a baby. That pad in the hammock literally makes it a better sleep than my bed at home. ;)

u/winningelephant · 2 pointsr/camping

I also have the Klymit Static V and can't recommend it enough. It's light and packable, has a 4.4 r-value, inflates in <15 breaths, and is genuinely comfortable.

You can also get great deals on them if you look. I think I paid $40 for mine, which ain't too shabby.

u/sterntheperm · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

Any thoughts on this one: KLYMIT Insulated Static V Camping Pad

u/xsforis · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

This is going to sound like overkill but on a recent car camping trip I used a coleman cot with my klymit insulated static v and I slept better than on some beds. I am in my late 30s and a side sleeper and the klymit pad is great even without the cot.

u/Jagrnght · 1 pointr/subaru

It's called a tent. Get a good set of mattresses like this klymit and you're good to go.

u/Xperimentx90 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

The klymit insulated static v is not much more expensive (52.40 with prime) and I love mine.

u/SpookyFries · 1 pointr/camping

Mine was the insulated Klymit Static V and my girlfriend's was the TNH Outdoors pad that was on sale on Amazon. Here are some links
https://www.amazon.com/Klymit-Insulated-Static-Sleeping-Pad/dp/B00ANRW7DI?th=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LEUYJN8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/mountainheatherhiker · 1 pointr/CampingGear

I'm not sure where you live, but buying gear in Scandinavia will cost a pretty penny. You probably need an ~15F/-10C bag to be comfy (as the weather looks to low around freezing). Else look for a COMFORT RATING around freezing (32F/0C). While a $300+ bag will probably be "better" (by better I mostly mean lighter) you should be able to find something reasonable for quite a bit less assuming you don't live in Scandinavia. Both of the bags you were looking at are from reputable companies, I can't read them (google translate isn't working for the site) but if they are within the ratings above and are acceptable in size/weight they will be fine. Make sure to get a good mat if you don't have one. I recommend klymit. Hope this helps!

u/cwwmbm · 1 pointr/bicycletouring

Mirage is a freestanding, isn't it? That's one thing I missed about the Banshee (and Naturehike I linked isn't freestanding either).

I would say tent should be the last thing you upgrade (unless you intend on backpacking), and you're right - start with the pad. Some of the modern ones are insanely comfortable, I'm a picky sleeper and I love S2S one. I also toured for couple weeks with the Thermarest XTherm and it was not bad, but also not nearly as comfortable as S2S.

If you're on a budget consider Klymit pads - here's one that weight 700g, packs very small, and has R value of 4.4 (meaning you can sleep on the snow and it will still insulate you enough). It costs around 50USD

https://www.amazon.ca/KLYMIT-Insulated-Static-Camping-Orange/dp/B00ANRW7DI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1497921003&sr=8-2&keywords=klymit+sleeping+pad

u/emptyflask · 1 pointr/CampingGear

The Klymit Insulated Static V might be a good option, especially for colder temperatures. I just bought one for an upcoming trip and have tried it out but haven't slept on it yet, but it seems to get a lot of good reviews.

u/authro · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

We actually went in late March, but Utah had a much colder winter/early spring last year. It got to the upper thirties overnight, and all three hammockers used sleeping bags and inflatable pads for warmth. I personally used a 0-degree Teton Leef bag and insulated Klymit Static V, and slept in thermals, fleece, down vest, and a beanie. I like to sleep warm, haha.

I'm confident enough about the trees that if I had a permit for #5 right now, going just off what I remember, I'd bring a hammock and maybe a bivy sack just in case. I'm like 90% sure it'd be fine. The campsites are beaten down enough that going to ground wouldn't be super difficult anyway. Note, though, that the trees in #4 are pretty low and bendy, so don't be surprised if you wake up on the ground anyway.

BTW I found a blog of someone that camped at #5 but the only picture that says it was taken from the campsite was this one.

edit: you HAVE to go see Kolob Arch; it's amazing.

u/Honeyblade · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

I can't sleep without a sleeping pad and there have been many many times where I was happy to have one. I have the Klymit V. It's not super expensive, it rolls up to about the size of a nalgine and is SUPER comfortable, as well as insulated.

u/_infal · 1 pointr/outdoorgear

I have the Klymit Insulated Static V Recon and have been happy with it. I've used it down to about 0c (32f ?).

It's a little less expensive if you don't mind the blaze orange. But overall fairly competitive compared to brands like ThermaRest.
https://www.amazon.com/Klymit-Insulated-Static-Sleeping-Orange/dp/B00ANRW7DI

Check out this comparison of sleeping pads with R values and other stats, it might help you find the right combo for your needs if the Klymit doesn't interest you.
http://sectionhiker.com/sleeping-pad-r-values/