Reddit Reddit reviews Klymit Static V Sleeping Pad, Lightweight, Outdoor Sleep Comfort for Backpacking, Camping, and Hiking, Inflatable Camping Mattress (Insulated and Non-Insulated), Green

We found 36 Reddit comments about Klymit Static V Sleeping Pad, Lightweight, Outdoor Sleep Comfort for Backpacking, Camping, and Hiking, Inflatable Camping Mattress (Insulated and Non-Insulated), Green. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Klymit Static V Sleeping Pad, Lightweight, Outdoor Sleep Comfort for Backpacking, Camping, and Hiking, Inflatable Camping Mattress (Insulated and Non-Insulated), Green
SLEEP COMFORT ALL NIGHT: Affordable lightweight camping pad with V-chamber design to limit air movement and heat loss for better support and comfortEASY-TO-USE valve allows for quick inflation and deflation of the Static V sleeping padINCREDIBLY LIGHTWEIGHT: Packed Weight: 18. 6 Ounces; Packed Size: 3 x 8 Inches; Made of durable and rugged 75D polyester fabricINFLATED SIZE: 72 x 23 x 2. 5 Inches; 10-15 breathsINCLUDES: Stuff Sack and patch included
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36 Reddit comments about Klymit Static V Sleeping Pad, Lightweight, Outdoor Sleep Comfort for Backpacking, Camping, and Hiking, Inflatable Camping Mattress (Insulated and Non-Insulated), Green:

u/cwcoleman · 12 pointsr/backpacking

You say tent and sleeping pads but have this tagged as Travel. I'm confused...

Why is REI not somewhere you want to shop? They sell quality gear and have educated salespeople.

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Your question is really wide open... Could you provide more details to help us help you?

  1. Where is your planned trip? When?
  2. What low temps do you plan to sleep in?
  3. Will you be solo or with a group? 1-person shelter or more?
  4. What is your budget?
  5. Do you value cost, weight, or quality most? Pick 2.
  6. What is your experience? Ever been on a day hike? Car camped?
  7. What gear do you need other than tent and sleeping pad?

    You don't have to be super specific with answers, but anything helps. Just trying to get an idea of your needs, because the options for backpacking gear are huge.

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    The goal is to keep your weight/bulk down. The #1 way to do this is by skipping gear that's unnecessary. While that's hard for someone new, since you don't know what is necessary vs. unnecessary, try hard to skip 'just-in-case' or too many 'luxury' items.

    If your full pack weight is under 30 pounds you are doing well, over 50 and you should rethink your approach.

    Most new backpackers will require a backpack in the 65 liter range. Fit is important to comfort, so if you could go into a local shop and try on a variety of options - do it.

    ----

    I wrote this semi-recently, check it out:

u/pointblankjustice · 10 pointsr/bugout

There is a lot wrong with this list, so I'm just going to work down it one by one with my thoughts on the matter.

USB flameless lighter? Why? That is going to be unreliable, at best. Throw a few BIC lighters and some stormproof matches in there and be done with it. IF you want to be fancy, get something built to be rugged, that will stand up to use in the field:

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Floating-Lighter/dp/B00C85NBA6/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173178&sr=1-2&keywords=camping+lighter

Speaking of, I didn't see any sort of firestarting material. Warmth is going to be important, and you need as few steps as possible between you and fire. Get some quality firestarters. I am trying to keep all my links relevant from amazon.ca, so some of the brands I'm most familiar with aren't there. But these work well (though there are options from Wetfire and other brands that take up less space):

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Fire-Stix/dp/B00C6SHODK/ref=sr_1_20?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173338&sr=1-20&keywords=emergency+fire+starter

What is with the mall-ninja "tactical" hatchet? That is a lot of weight and not a lot of utility. You'd be better served with a reliable and lightweight folding saw, and a good full-tang fixed-blade knife. Something like a 7 inch Corona saw:

https://www.amazon.ca/Corona-Cutting-Tools-RS-7041/dp/B00004R9YN/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173467&sr=1-1&keywords=corona+folding+saw

If you insist on carrying a hatchet (and their function in a bugout situation is debatable, especially for the weight) get something quality like an Estwing:

https://www.amazon.ca/Estwing-E24A-14-Inch-Sportmans-Sheath/dp/B00BNQR4SG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173510&sr=1-1&keywords=estwing+hatchet

Nothing wrong with duct tape, but you'd do well to wrap just maybe 3-4 meters of it around a small core (like from doggy waste bags, or even just around itself).

The self-crank radio/flashlight/phone charger is shit. You also don't need four lights, especially if all of them are crap. Buy one good flashlight, and maybe one good headlamp.

A flashlight like a Nitecore P12 or something that runs on an 18650 and offers long runtime would be ideal. If you buy a diffuser cap for it, you can replace the lantern. Pick up some spare, high quality 18650 cells, as well. The P12 has SOS and beacon modes, which will run for days at a time, in addition to a nice throw and excellent brightness on Medium and High.

https://www.amazon.ca/Nitecore-Flashlight-Lumens-Meters-Distance/dp/B00PQE1D2E/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173859&sr=1-2&keywords=nitecore+P12

As for headlamps, those don't need to be super bright. You want something with enough brightness and floodiness to work around camp. But ideally you also want a red-light or low-light mode for night time, when you don't need to destroy your night vision just because you need to take a piss or something.

https://www.amazon.ca/TACTIKKA-CONSTANT-LIGHTING-HEADLAMP-DESERT/dp/B00GCGIGHK/ref=sr_1_14?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173989&sr=1-14&keywords=petzl+headlamp

The powerbank thing in the crank radio is crap, only 1000mah. Not enough to charge most modern smart phones even 25%. Figure that of that 1000mah, ~25% will be lost just due to inefficiency in the charging process. Get a 10,000mah or bigger high quality battery, with 2.1A ports, and be done with it:

https://www.amazon.ca/Anker-PowerCore-Portable-Ultra-Compact-High-speed-Charging-Technology/dp/B0194WDVHI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482173708&sr=8-1&keywords=anker+usb+power+bank

Combine the money you'd spend on the shitty folding knife and the shitty Gerber multitool, and buy a proper multi-tool. You don't need two folding knives.

The Leatherman Wingman is a good value, though I prefer a nicer quality one like the Charge TTi, but at four times the price it may not be worth it just for an S30V blade.

https://www.amazon.ca/Leatherman-2996-831426-Wingman-Multi-Tool/dp/B005DI0XM4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482174264&sr=8-1&keywords=leatherman+wave

Ditch the camp toilet paper, that stuff is like wiping your ass with cardboard. Get some biodegradable camp wipes from an outdoor store. You can now use these to clean your ass, and they also are useful for wiping your hands, or taking whore baths.

Same with the camp soap. Are you bugging out or camping for a week? Nothing you are going to do in a bugout situation is going to necessitate body soap. Toothbrush, floss, deodorant.

Ditch the giant first aid kit full of crap you don't need. Those things are heavy and 80 of the 85 pieces are just different sized bitch stickers. Build your own first aid kit tailored around the likely injuries you would face: sprains, cuts, burns. Maybe throw some Quik Clot Z-pack gauze or a tourniquet (CAT or similar) in there for larger trauma, if that is a concern to you. Limit the bitch stickers to 5-10. All gauze, tape, trauma pads, alcohol wipes, tincture of iodine, moleskin for blisters, tweezers, surgical shears, gloves, maybe burn cream. Small containers of medications you might need: aspirin, antihistamines like Diphenhydramine, anti-diarrheals, etc.

That survival paracord bracelet thing is garbage. You already have 100ft of paracord in your list (which you could probably cut down to 50ft). You don't need some shitty firestarter, whistle, and compass thing. Buy a real lensatic sighting compass. Not going to do you much good without a map and the ability to understand it, anyway.

https://www.amazon.ca/UST-Survival-Essentials-Lensatic-Compass/dp/B005X1YI3Q/ref=sr_1_5?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174799&sr=1-5&keywords=compass

You have both a cookset AND a mug/pot. This is extra redundant and not needed in a bugout situation. Stick to food you don't have to prepare. Caloric density is your friend. Jerky, EPIC bars, Clif bars, etc.

If you need to boil water, use a single-wall metal canteen (NOT a thermos). Remove the plastic lid, fill with water, set in your fire. Widemouth canteens like those by Klean Kanteen are multi-purpose (multipurpose is your friend). You can sterilize water, you can cook and eat food out of it (because of the large opening), and you can fill with hot water, wrap in a sock, and warm your sleep system.

https://www.amazon.ca/Klean-Kanteen-Stainless-Bottle-27-Ounce/dp/B0027W6WHE/ref=sr_1_sc_4?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174908&sr=1-4-spell&keywords=klean+kanteen+widemouth

You don't need a can opener if you have a good multitool.

Lifestraws suck ass. They only work as a straw, and I am going to guess you don't want to get your water by drinking out of puddles exclusively. Get a Sawyer Squeeze mini filter. This can be used in-line with a hydration bladder, can be used like a Lifestraw, or can be used to filter an fill your water storage containers/bladder:

https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175065&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

One seriously lacking area for you is your sleep system. A tarp and a space blanket are not going to keep you functionally warm. You might survive a night, but you won't be useful the next day.

At the BARE minimum, you should get a good, reflective, breathable bivvy sack, like this one from SOL, AND a sleeping pad. A bivvy will reflect heat back onto you, helping with heat lost through convection, but no sleeping bag will help with heat lost through conduction (you touching the cold ground). That is why a sleeping pad is mandatory. I have used the Escape bivvy and the Klymit pad linked here together, and both kept me comfortably warm to about 50 degrees F. Below that, I've had to augment with base layers or jackets, and that still sucked. If you are hoping to sleep in below freezing temperatures, you'll need a properly sorted ultralight sleeping bag.

https://www.amazon.ca/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Escape-Bivvy/dp/B00EVGD0FQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175280&sr=1-1&keywords=SOL+escape

https://www.amazon.ca/Klymit-06SVGR01C-Camping-Mattress-Green-Grey/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175199&sr=1-1&keywords=sleep+pad

Other recommendations of mine would be to take survival, medical and foraging guides and put them on a smartphone, along with a GPS mapping software and pre-downloaded offline topographical maps at 1:24k resolution of your main bugout areas and 1:100k resolution elsewhere. Something like Gaia GPS for iOS or Backcountry Navigator Pro for Android:

u/onoku · 9 pointsr/army

I used this sleeping pad for two weeks and I slept like a log every night. Also a side sleeper.

u/anachronic · 6 pointsr/camping

I love my Klymit. The thing folds up to the size of a Nalgene bottle and is way more comfortable than you'd expect. I'm 5'10, 190lbs and like to sleep on my side and sleep great on this.

Other alternative (which is decidedly NOT convenient and is bulky, but is insanely comfortable if you're going car camping or using it stationary in your apartment and don't need to lug it around) is getting a memory foam mattress like this. I pull this out when friends crash at my apartment and they have all raved about how comfy it is. It's also great for cold weather camping, since the foam is a great insulator. I had this one on a trip that got down to 37 overnight and it kept me super toasty.

u/BraveLilToaster42 · 5 pointsr/JustNoSO

You got this. Start sneaking the things that matter to you into the truck you want to take so long as your wife won't notice (i.e. put the tarot deck you like in the glove box). It's not much but it will feel like something.

One trick I've heard from people who voluntarily lived in their cars was that they joined a cheap 24 hour gym so they could shower. When you're ready to leave, check Good Will for secondhand camp gear if you need it. If you want to splurge, this is the one I used at a music festival. It was great.

If you feel like putting down roots on the east coast and need a safe place to park, give me a buzz.

u/Fents_Post · 5 pointsr/canoecamping

I have the Klymit Static V. Better than a foam pad. Packs down small. Within your budget. https://www.amazon.com/Klymit-Static-Lightweight-Sleeping-Green/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1499701452&sr=8-3&keywords=klymit+static+v

My "go to" is my Exped SynMat 7. Packs small. Very comfortable. Built in pump. But outside your budget but worth the money IMO. https://www.amazon.com/Exped-SynMat-Sleeping-Terracotta-Long/dp/B0018MC976/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1499701508&sr=8-3&keywords=exped+mat

u/SkippyMGee · 5 pointsr/HikingAlberta

This time of year you can get away with a cheaper -4C sleeping bag, but if you have a little extra coin, get a better one.

A compression sack for the sleeping bag.

These are good mattresses.

Bring a light coat. This can double up as a pillow at night.

If you plan on cooking anything, a pocket stove and a fuel canister, and a 1L stainless steep pot. Spoon or fork (I just cook dehydrated food).

A tent with a fly.

Headlamp.

Bear spray and small air horn.

A few pairs of socks and underwear.

Baby wipes.

Ziplocks for trash. Toilet paper. Ideally a bear canister.

Toque, long johns, pair of sandals.

Food.

50' of parachord.

Light clothes that are NOT cotton.

Cook a very decent distance away from your tenting area, and clean a good distance away from your tenting area. Avoid strong smelling food. Know what a bear hang is and learn how to use it if it's available.

u/dharmabum28 · 4 pointsr/camping

This one has treated me extremely well, being that I'm an ultra light fan, that it's comfortable enough, pretty sturdy, packs tiny, and the price is great: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007RFG0NM/ref=abs_brd_tag_dp?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

u/nestiv · 3 pointsr/Sacramento

I'm just going to drop in and advocate approaching backpacking with the ultralight philosophy. The key principle behind ultralight is to bring only what you need for any given trip and, ideally, nothing more.

Now I'm not saying don't pack things that will add value to your trip, but one of the biggest pitfalls to backpacking is packing in your fears. When people first start, they often bring excessive amounts of clothing, safety gear to outfit an expedition company, more entertainment than one might realistically want or use, or an entire kitchen - sink included. However, most people will discover that if they can lighten the load on their shoulders, they will end up enjoying trips much more. It's best to consider what you need (or even what can be shared in this instance!) - e.g. sharing shelters, cook systems, entertainment, food. Clothing-wise as long as you have an insulating layer (fleece or down jacket) and a rain jacket, and you're more than likely good to go.

So with all that in mind, let's talk about gear more specifically. If you're just getting started, it's best to borrow gear if possible. Sans that option, trying cheap gear is totally reasonable. However as with any hobby, there can be massive differences your random Amazon gear and even the bottom-of-the-barrel hobbyist gear. If you expect you'll want to pursue backpacking more in the future, consider looking into the ultralight and ultracheap gear list recommendations as well as the alternative options.

Since we're looking at coastal trips in California, you can safely estimate lows to be no lower than 40° unless you're truly up in the mountains. Sleeping pad-wise I'd recommend either an inflatable like the Klymit Static V or a CCF pad like the Z-Lite Sol or RidgeRest. I hesitate to recommend an ultralight quilt for a first-timer due to cost, but for reference a 30° HammockGear Econ Burrow weighs 18.62 oz, whereas the one OP linked weighs ~4 lbs.

There's a lot more to be said than what I've mentioned, so I invite y'all to check out /r/ultralight for more discussions on ultralight philosophies and gear. The wiki is a tremendously helpful resource as well. If any of you want a pack shakedown to have someone look over your gear list, feel free to reply or DM me, and I'll try to get back to you when I can. I'll most likely either be out in Texas or climbing Shasta for the weekend this trip will be planned, but have fun out there!

Also paging /r/ulnorcal - /u/Sharp_LR35902 /u/id3550

u/rtothewin · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_2elDCbPHNFCCB

u/Charming_geek · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Hey all. Relatively new to the ultralight scene, but have been trying to go lighter weight over the last few years. Will probably still be a while before I'm true ultralight (6lbs for the big 4?), but my current plan would have me at 7-7.5 lbs for the big 4. Was curious about your input / any suggestions for improvements:

  • Tent - Naturehike CloudUp2 (owned) - $120, 3.30 lbs (shared with wife, 1.65 lbs)
  • Pad - Klymit Static V (owned) - Bought for $50, 1.15 pounds
  • Bag - Mountaintop 40 Liter Hiking Backpack (owned) - Bought for $27 in an amazon lightning sale, 2.05 lbs.
  • Sleeping bag - Hyke & Byke Eolus 15 degree 800 FP down bag (plan to buy) - $150, 2.54 lbs

    Overall, $350/7.4 lbs for the big 4. I definitely know there's room for improvement and I will probably be replacing things as I can afford it. The most obvious place for improvement is the bag, but I'd actually bought one for my wife as a temporary hiking bag for our first hike-in camp together but we ended up both really liking it. It's comfortable and for $27 it was hard to pass up, especially as it has all the compartments I like in a hiking bag (i.e. access to the bottom section for the sleeping bag). Welcome to criticisms and suggestions.
u/xsforis · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I'm in North Central Florida and don't find it too warm. They make one that is not insulated if you are worried about it being too warm. http://amzn.com/B007RFG0NM

u/GeronimoRay · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

This is the best sleeping pad I've ever come across: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007RFG0NM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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Feels like I'm sleeping on air.

u/xucchini · 2 pointsr/teslamotors

Model 3 does not have native camper mode as of 2018.42.2 which is what I currently have installed. Also, I went camping when I still had version 8.

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The HVAC if turned on via phone or API at that time would only run for 30 mins before shutting off. The overheat protection wasn't implemented yet. So I had TeslaFi send a wake up HVAC command every 30 minutes throughout the night which kept it on all night.

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I am about 6ft tall and found it comfortable space wise. Temp/humidity wise it was perfect with the HVAC enabled.

I used one of these in the back seat foot well to sort of extend the surface as I like to sleep on my side with one arm extended out beyond my head:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B074SV35KL/

I used this as a sleeping pad. It was very comfortable, but it did slide around due to being kind of slippery. One night I woke up with the lower half of my body off the pad.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007RFG0NM

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One thing that sucked for me is that with v8 I couldn't control the entertainment system with the app from the back of the car. But now you can! :)

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Referral code for TeslaFi is "ZJ" without the quotes.

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u/Sn0wland · 2 pointsr/bikepacking
u/any-major-dude · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring

I use the Klymit Static V

While I can't compare it directly to any of the other options here, it packs up very small and is not too expensive. It also has very solid Amazon reviews.

u/parametrek · 2 pointsr/preppers

I've been very impressed with Fox40 whistles. They are used by referees and are amazing at getting attention.

You don't necessarily need a license for the radios. FRS or CB for example. Besides if only you have a license and radio then how can you talk with the rest of your family?

> And do you have any recommendations on those sleeping pads?

Tons ^_^ I've been making a database of sleeping pads for fun.

The least expensive compact pads that people seem to like are made by Outdoorsman Labs. This is their most compact. Though for a few dollars more there is the namebrand Klymic Static V. These are both 0.9 liters packed.

The best deal that I know of at the moment is the $30 Eureka Singlis ST. Normally $50. It is a little heavier and bulkier (1.2 liters) but is notable for having a built in pump.

edit: Forgot to mention that Klymit has an ebay store where they sell their refurbished units. The Static V is $40 there.

u/J0BlN · 2 pointsr/Coachella

I don’t think you’re taking enough Benadryl is the problem (nsfw)

Real answer: I use this one and it’s treated my back well. Good for back and side sleepers.

u/darthjenni · 2 pointsr/camping

I am old and fat, I like a lot of squish, and most of the time we are camping in the desert.

We have the old version of the Neo Air. It is good for car camping and backpacking. Coupler kit

We also have an old Dreamtime for car camping that has served us well over the years. It has a built in coupler.

This year we upgraded to Exped MegaMat 10 LXW. It is well worth the money. We camp 2+ months out of the year. And this mat should last 7+ years. So for us it is a good investment.

The guys over in /r/CampingGear would get mad if I didn't mention the Klymit Static V. It is dirt cheep compared to everything I have recommended. And they make a Double V

The best thing you can do is go to a store and try them out.

One more thought, if you are car camping you don't need sleeping bags. A set of flannel sheets and a cheep comforter will keep you just as warm.

u/M_Mitchell · 2 pointsr/MTB

I have the Lynx 2 person tent and like it.

The Lynx 1 person also looks like a fantastic option.

Only thing I don't like is their performance in the wind. If the wind hits the sides it'll blow into you a little but if you are not in a field you should be more than fine.

Are you trying to put your bike into it too? I just ran a chain around a tree and through the bike and then ran one of the tents supports through and made it supported by the bike so noone could remove it while I was sleeping.

Here is something that kinda includes your bike but it's not going to shield your bike if that's what you want.

My personal recommendation is to go with one of the lynxs and then use the rest of your budget for a decent flashlight/lantern, and a sleeping pad.

This is my sleeping pad and while nice, I would recommend getting something a little bigger because I would roll on the edges pretty frequently.

u/rouselle · 2 pointsr/backpacking

Yes they are off my list because I ended up purchasing them. The pad was the [Klymit Static V](Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_kesFxbNDWCCR4) and the bag was the [Teton Trailhead 20](TETON Sports TrailHead 20F Ultralight Sleeping Bag, Orange/Grey https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007JTLKCC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_dgsFxbG1YRZ7S). I wasn't feeling the quality of the Teton bag so I ended up returning that. Never used it on the trail but laying in my bed with it I didn't like the feel of the fabric. That's one thing that I'm going to put more money into. As for the pad though it's awesome. Took my sickly lungs about 20 breaths to blow up but it works well. It definitely doesn't need to be pumped up as tight as an air bed. Good quality item there that o would buy again.

u/doodoo_gumdrop · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I am looking at some budget pads like the Trail Scout or the Klymit V Lightweight. Sounds like the consensus so far is manual. Might wait until I can afford a better manual one.

u/MacintoshEddie · 1 pointr/Edmonton

I suppose I should follow up on this and mention sleeping pads. I recommend staying away from the huge ones that require an electric pump. The pump always breaks. It's a rule of the universe that some poor bastard has to spend what feels like three hours inflating the mattress manually. Usually right after you've inhaled some smoke and your lungs are already compromised.

I use the Klymit Static V
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/aw/d/B007RFG0NM

It's been pretty great so far. I'm at the bare edge of being too tall for it at 6', but having my feet hang over isn't the end of the world. Packs away small, doesn't take too long to inflate manually, and is even okay for side sleepers. Some sleep pads can't handle the smaller footprint of side sleepers and they don't provide any support. I can also recommend the Snugpak jungle blanket. Packs away small and is decently warm. A good thing to have just in case. Nights in a tent can get colder than you'd think.

u/Dzdimi14 · 1 pointr/backpacking

I recommend [this sleeping pad] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B007RFG0NM/ref=ya_aw_od_pi?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

It's pretty light, packs down to smaller than a Nalgene, and is super comfy. All that and it's pretty cheap for what it is!

u/real_parksnrec · 1 pointr/CampingGear

I'm also a side sleeper. This last Xmas trip I used this three-layer combo: air pad (Klymit Static V) on top of a thick closed-cell foam pad (something better than the thin blue pads) on top of a doubled-up sheet of Reflectix.

I slept like a (big, hairy, snoring) baby. The cost was less than $80.

u/crimsontongue · 1 pointr/onebag

A Coleman fleece sleeping bag (basically a thicker liner) from Target/Walmart will give you a little more padding, and significantly more warmth than a sleeping bag liner, but isn't really much better than just sleeping in a jacket. If padding is what you're after, get a Klymit inflatable sleeping pad (there are a bunch of variations like this), which will also serve well outdoors (get the insulated version if you're serious though, at the cost of extra weight). Are you crashing on the floor or a couch? Carpet or wood? For two nights do you need to take something potentially bulky?

u/LackThereOf13 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Just thought I’d chime in here and say if you are looking at getting the klymit static v Amazon has it on sale today for 41 bucks and some change

Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_4wRTzb65DNP21

u/BoogieJeans · 1 pointr/festivals

i wouldnt bother with tent stakes. she will find plenty of those at festivals. Ive never had to use a first aid kit, either... get her something she mightn't have thought of, that she will constantly have to use.
https://www.amazon.com/Klymit-Static-Lightweight-Sleeping-Green/dp/B007RFG0NM?ref_=bl_dp_s_mw_6764188011
these are amazing.
Maybe a hydroflask and/or camelbak if she doesnt already have those things.
flashlight/headlamp.

u/no1likesthetunahere · 1 pointr/motocamping

Yea, "craps table" :P


You guys sound rad! Keep it up. Just a few suggestions in case you haven't thought of them:

  • microfiber towel (cheap on Amazon, dry super fast)
  • headlamp (because you somehow always ending up arriving late and setting up a tent needs 2 hands)
  • Morrivoe Outdoor Folding Chair Portable Mesh Chair with Aluminum Alloy Support,Suitable for Camping Picnic Fishing Hiking + Free Carry Bag (Green) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B01M8IBYVC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_DI6RybVGZ2D8Z
    Packs up very small, lightweight, super comfy. Because your butt needs a good lounge after a full day of riding. A rock/stump/picnic table doesn't cut it
  • Klymit 06SVGR01C Static V Camping Mattress (Green-Grey, Large) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VM6RybFHWN4Z1
    There is no better mattress for bike camping. It packs down the smallest and lightest. While being 100% comfortable.
  • zip ties, paracord and duct tape wrapped around an old credit card. Because you can fix absolutely anything with this trifecta


    Hope that helps!
u/RightTrash · 1 pointr/Narcolepsy

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/
This is a nice and lightweight, quickly inflated with a few breaths, sleep pad.

u/travellingmonk · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Stansport Scout, about as basic a tent as you can find. You can find others on Amazon, but they're all pretty much the same. I used one in the 70's as a Scout and I really wouldn't use one today for a lot of reasons... but the main one was that it was hard to get in and out as a teen without knocking the pole out of place and collapsing the tent (or have others steal your poles in the middle of the night). Can't see it being easy as an adult to get in and out without knocking over the poles.

Klymit Static V. Pretty good pad for the price. Of course you can find cheaper knock-offs, but this one is fairly well rated and comfortable enough and warm enough for three seasons. But if you want something for winter, you'll need something a lot more expensive like the Exped Downmat 9.

A sleeping bag down to -18C, think you need to go with a good bag like the Feathered Friends Widgeon. Not something I'd like to carry with me during the summer, you might want to pick up a nice 30F bag for the other three seasons.

Amazon Basics now carries a very popular cookset. The Etekcity Stove is a good stove for the price; the quality isn't as good as the MSR Pocket Rocket 2, but you get two for $20 which is a really good deal. While you can buy one for $15, might as well spend a few extra bucks and get a spare.

As for the FAK, I try to carry the smallest one possible, one that I've whipped together based on what I usually need. However, if you're looking for a bug-out bag, you may want a nice big kit like the Adventure Medical Sportsman Series which can deal with more serious wounds. Still, you can just look around, there plenty of lists for building your own kit.

The other thing you'll need is a water purifier. The ones backpackers use like the Sawyer Squeeze are considered "filters", they're designed to draw water from clean fresh sources and can fliter out things like Crypto and Giardia but not pollutants like heavy metals or pesticides; for a bug out bag you may want a more expensive purifier that can remove heavy metals and chemicals. Actually don't have a recommendation there... but you could just pick up a Sawyer and make sure you draw from clean sources.

u/tupperwhatever · 1 pointr/bicycling

you absolutely want more than a red cross bivy....you can still get a light setup for decent price, and this gear will last you a very long time.

Kelty Salida 1 Tent

Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black

Kelty Cosmic 40 Degree Sleeping Bag, Regular, Smoke/Dark Shadow

u/MadCabbages · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Wow, fantastic answer. Thank you!

By cheapish I mean all gear for the trip for under about €500.

Re Gear: I couldn't find suppliers for the gear you suggested in Europe and shipping was very expensive from the US so what do you think of these.
Tent
Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Mat
Stove set
with something like this as a bear bag (with rope etc)?

Re Food: Yes there is alot of villeges/towns along the way. However I was looking at this and thought it might be a good idea.. I will look into water purification device as well.

I don't think my budget will extend to a GPS device this time around so a map/compass + smartphone it is!

Sorry for all the silly questions. Your answer the last time helped a lot!

u/oboz_waves · 1 pointr/camping

Here’s the one I bought and I love it. It’s a little on the pricy side of them but it comes with a little repair kit and I’ve used it as low as 15-20F comfortably