Reddit Reddit reviews Sperry Instruments GFI6302 GFCI Outlet / Receptacle Tester, Standard 120V AC Outlets, 7 Visual Indication / Wiring Legend, Home & Professional Use, Yellow & Black

We found 77 Reddit comments about Sperry Instruments GFI6302 GFCI Outlet / Receptacle Tester, Standard 120V AC Outlets, 7 Visual Indication / Wiring Legend, Home & Professional Use, Yellow & Black. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Sperry Instruments GFI6302 GFCI Outlet / Receptacle Tester, Standard 120V AC Outlets, 7 Visual Indication / Wiring Legend, Home & Professional Use, Yellow & Black
DURABLE: Hi-Impact Resistant ABS housing with soft over-molded rubber grips with a compact ergonomic design (GFI6302 and VD6504)QUICKLY READ: Bright color-coded neon lights for easy visual indication (GFI6302)TESTING CAPABILITY: Standard 3-Wire and GFCI protected 120Volt AC Outlets. Frequency (Hertz) 60Hz (GFI6302)GFCI FUNCTION: Tests GFI Outlets and standard outlets that are wired in series with GFCI outlets (multiple outlets in kitchen or bath)RATED: 10 ft Drop and 250 lb Crush, CAT Rating III 300V, C-UL US, CE-Marking and recognized by Occupational Safety Hazards Association (OSHA) as an National Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL). 10 ft Drop and 250 lb CrushWARRANTY: Sperry Instruments Backed Limited Lifetime Warranty
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77 Reddit comments about Sperry Instruments GFI6302 GFCI Outlet / Receptacle Tester, Standard 120V AC Outlets, 7 Visual Indication / Wiring Legend, Home & Professional Use, Yellow & Black:

u/parametrek · 26 pointsr/WeAreTheMusicMakers

It sounds like some of the outlets might have a reversed hot/neutral. Get a cheap outlet tester to find out. And a pigtail adapter to test the 2-prong outlets. Fixing it is pretty simple if you are comfortable working with wiring.

u/knucklebone · 15 pointsr/sysadmin

sounds like a power surge got the switch... is it plugged into a quality surge protector? Also, try a plug tester like this to make sure the ports are wired up properly and the ground is working. I've seen this happen a few times, and had it happen personally from a messed up plug. Surge suppression is usually only on the live side of the mains.

Another thing to remember, is that the surge suppression components in power strips do degrade over time, and may not provide proper protection.

u/DonCasper · 14 pointsr/homelab

I prefer the plug tester that actually plugs into the wall because the non-contact ones can be tripped by live wires in the same junction box.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/

I think I got mine at a home improvement store for $5. Obviously it's for standard us outlets only.

u/Nicker · 12 pointsr/Monitors

you could always get something like this: https://smile.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU

lets you know if your outlets are properly grounded. once you find the bad ones, you can work on tieing in new wiring for grounding in rooms that have sensitive electronics you don't want fried.

u/asilvermtzion · 11 pointsr/synthesizers

It's not normal and is potentially dangerous. It seems likely you have a grounding issue and such problems have, historically, been fatal to some musicians, particularly guitarists, Keith Relf of the Yardbirds for instance. Modern equipment tends to be a lot safer and electrocution is less likely but it's still a risk. While the voltage you've felt, so far, is harmless it could indicate that you're ungrounded and if a fault were to develop with any of the interconnected equipment stray voltage could be present on the conductive surfaces of your gear and the cables connected to them.

You in the US? Get an electrical outlet tester like one of these and test the wall outlets you use. If the tester shows a fault get an electrician to come and repair it. If the wall outlets test as OK, test the first power strip, then the next, then the next, until you find where the fault is and then dispose of that strip and get a new one.

u/Nuhhea · 8 pointsr/AskMenOver30

Electrical outlet tester - Use on each outlet in the home to make sure all is working properly and not needing work done. I used Sperry Tester
Test the sinks, toilets and showers. Run both cold water and hot water through each sink/shower and flush the toilets a couple of times.
Ask about pest control, how often, who does it.
How do you contact maintenance for any requests? How quickly can they come out to assist?
Check the windows and make sure they can open, or are securely locked.
Who has keys to your location? Did the last tenant turn in all keys? Can you get the location re-keyed for a small fee?
Hope this helps!

u/logmeinbro · 6 pointsr/HomeImprovement

Grab one of these and check outlets around your house.

u/congelar · 6 pointsr/techsupportgore

> Even if you have polarized plugs, like in the US, you can't even be sure that the electricians wired the outlet the right way around.

Don't trust, test.

u/0110010001100010 · 6 pointsr/HomeImprovement
u/jdogherman · 6 pointsr/volt

the EVSE is detecting that the outlet is not wired as it expects. Do you have an outlet tester? Maybe something like this? https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU

u/CommonModeReject · 5 pointsr/livesound

> I've come to realize that the whole venue isnt properly grounded aftering dealing with this hiss/hum from all the mains.

You have actually tested the grounding right? You're not just making an assumption? These things cost like $10. http://amzn.com/B000RUL2UU

u/KGB420 · 5 pointsr/HomeImprovement

>a modern house with current wiring would also experience overheating

This issue was not present at our previous residence.

>How do you know they are not grounded?

I plugged one of these into the outlets, and it reports open ground.

u/jonschwartz · 5 pointsr/smallbusiness

They sell GFCI testers which will reliably trip the breaker without causing damage (assuming the wiring is done somewhat properly). It wouldn't break anything, but would disable the outlet and would bug the neighbor. Here's the one I have https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000RUL2UU/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/Kv603 · 5 pointsr/DIY

It was pretty common in homes of a certain era to install a GFCI outlet and then daisy-chain a bunch of outlets, even in an entirely different room, off that one GFCI outlet.

It might not be obvious how the circuit is run, you can pick up a cheap test tool at the hardware store with a GFCI-test button on it, that will trigger the GFCI in the chain, if one exists.

u/elektrikeye · 5 pointsr/MPSelectMiniOwners

The location of the power supply doesn't have anything to do with it, the power supply still takes in 120V AC Power and converts it to 12V DC power. When you have a ground fault that circuit will feed back through the line in an attempt to get to earth. I would highly recommend checking your outlet/surge protector with something like this:
https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/

If your outlet is still good, I would return the printer if you can.

u/1new_username · 4 pointsr/HomeImprovement

I use one of these

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000RUL2UU/

You plug it in the outlet and push the button on top. If the outlet is on a gfci, it should trip it and the power at that outlet (and any others on the gfci) will go out.

u/cheezbergher · 4 pointsr/assholedesign

You get a simple outlet tester like this:

Sperry Instruments GFI6302 GFCI Outlet / Receptacle Tester, Standard 120V AC Outlets, 7 Visual Indication / Wiring Legend, Home & Professional Use, Yellow & Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_i_yBILDbSMB9JYX

u/LobsterAuntie · 4 pointsr/Columbus

GFCI outlets on a GFCI circuit breaker? I think that's overkill unless there was some funny wiring going on.

Here is a tester that will show if the outlet is wired correctly and if it's GFCI protected. Might be worth the $5 for piece of mind:

Sperry Instruments GFI6302 GFCI Outlet / Receptacle Tester, Standard 120V AC Outlets, 7 Visual Indication / Wiring Legend, Home & Professional Use, Yellow & Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_cUWeAbQG51J7V

ETA: There could also be another GFCI outlet on the circuit that you don't know about that is providing GFCI protection. The GFCI outlet that was protecting the other outlets in our bathroom was under the sink, tucked under a shelf that I did not notice for two years until the outlets stopped working and I needed to find out why.

u/sick937 · 4 pointsr/HomeImprovement

No idea about the cost, but if you have a level of confidence and have some idea what you're doing, you could pop the cover off that electric panel and see what type of wires run into the circuit breakers and what they feed. If modern wires run into breaker #1, and you turn that off and the wall fixtures turn off.. well there you go.

K&T should be easier to spot inside the box, no ground, probably dusty, and wrapped in cloth. Mapping the breakers, figuring out what controls what room/wall/fixture is a good idea. Flip them off one at a time and have someone upstairs plugging something in an checking them..

Also, I highly recommend one of these guys to quikcly test and tell you if the wiring is correct:

http://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=pd_cp_hi_0

u/edisonlbm · 4 pointsr/homeowners

If you go that far, I'd reccomend getting something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1519316688&sr=8-3

It will show problems that you might miss if you are just plugging something in, and it's a good idea to test GFCI too.

u/hobbykitjr · 3 pointsr/HomeImprovement

Buy one of these

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000RUL2UU/ref=pd_aw_fbt_328_img_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0CV79NQW6DYC13JCVQF3

Test all of them.

it will not tell you when you need an outlet replaced. It will only show you if the outlet is wired correctly or incorrectly. Make sure that when you push your GFCI back into the box that no bare copper is touching bare copper on the neutral/white conductor in the box. Also make sure that the conductors are tight in the terminal screws of your GFCI. You probably need to replace your GFCI with a new one if none of the previous suggestions work. Make sure that you turn the power off to the receptacle prior to removing it from the outlet box & working on the device

u/tyescott · 3 pointsr/AskElectronics

Buy one of these and plug it in. It'll let you know if the receptacle is wired wrong. They can be had at nearly any home improvement store as well

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_WPpxwb3N4BPEH

u/neuromonkey · 3 pointsr/DIY

Some ceilings have cats. Be on the lookout for that.

I am assuming that you're already following the suggestions about vent size and shape...

In home electrical stuff, there are three wires for 110v circuits: Hot (usually black, though can be red or blue,) Neutral (white,) and ground (either green or uninsulated copper.)

Power flows through a completed circuit between the neutral and hot wired. Ground is there to catch any stray electrons that might leak, and divert them to a safe place (deep into the earth; note that ground is called "earth" in the UK.) Ground gets connected to metal casings, boxes, cabinets, chassis, etc. Anything conductive that a person could possibly touch should be connected to ground. (Neutral runs to ground at some point. If Hot gets grounded, or touches Neutral, that's a short circuit, and should pop a breaker.)

First, find the breaker switch (or fuse) that provides power to your ceiling fan's circuit. If your fan is busted and has no light in it, you may need to hook something else up to the white & black to find the right circuit. Note: If the circuit wasn't wired correctly (the most common problem is switching hot & neutral,) then you can get zapped from the fan wiring EVEN IF THE WALL SWITCH IS TURNED OFF! The HOT (black) wire must be the one that gets switched. Neutral should be a straight run to your breaker box.

You can check to see if a circuit is wired correctly using a small, cheap device like this circuit tester.

I am assuming that you're already following the suggestions about vent size and shape...

In home electrical stuff, there are three wires for 110v circuits: Hot (usually black, though can be red or blue,) Neutral (white,) and ground (either green or uninsulated copper.)

Power flows through a completed circuit between the neutral and hot wired. Ground is there to catch any stray electrons that might leak, and divert them to a safe place (deep into the earth; note that ground is called "earth" in the UK.) Ground gets connected to metal casings, boxes, cabinets, chassis, etc. Anything conductive that a person could possibly touch should be connected to ground. (Neutral runs to ground at some point. If Hot gets grounded, or touches Neutral, that's a short circuit, and should pop a breaker.)

First, find the breaker switch (or fuse) that provides power to your ceiling fan's circuit. If your fan is busted and has no light in it, you may need to hook something else up to the white & black to find the right circuit. Note: If the circuit wasn't wired correctly (the most common problem is switching hot & neutral,) then you can get zapped from the fan wiring EVEN IF THE WALL SWITCH IS TURNED OFF! The HOT (black) wire must be the one that gets switched. Neutral should be a straight run to your breaker box. You should shut off the breaker when doing any work on the wiring.

You can check to see if a circuit is wired correctly using a small, cheap device like this circuit tester. That type is designed for testing wall receptacles, but once you identify the hot prong (small prong, on appliances,) neutral (large prong, with "wings",) and ground (round one, bottom middle,) you're headed in the right direction.

u/notaneggspert · 3 pointsr/DiWHY

These are $4 and idiot proof. I honestly wouldn't know how to check ground/neutral with a multi-meter.

Edit: Splurge on the $7 tester with a GFCI test, even if you're not replacing your bathroom receptacle you can double check it works.

u/tubezninja · 3 pointsr/HomeImprovement

Well, it depends.

A cheater plug should have a tab at the bottom. That tab is supposed to be attached to the screw that you'd find in the center of the outlet, between the top and bottom receptacles.

On some of these older outlets, the receptacle box itself is grounded, so, screwing the cheater tab in properly will act as a ground for your cheater plug. The question is, are your outlet boxes grounded? They might or might not be. Only way to be sure would be to use an outlet tester after it's installed.

This of course also means you're going to need to cut off power at the breaker box while your'e screwing around with the outlets, to avoid electrocuting yourself. And if you're not comfortable with messing around with outlets, don't risk it.

u/NotAddicted · 3 pointsr/teslamotors

It's not a terribly complicated concept. You're basically hacking together a 240v circuit. Here's a site that explains how to build your own clone.

Edit: You probably don't want to try to use something like this on a circuit that's already sketchy. For example, it isn't unheard-of for a previous homeowner to have ignorantly swapped hot and neutral on a circuit when they replaced a socket. A Quick220-like device will end up directly shorting such a circuit, and that's not good. In fact it's "burst into flames" bad if the breaker is also faulty. Get yourself a tester and know how to read the lights.

u/locool676 · 2 pointsr/techsupport

Here is a quick how to: http://www.acmehowto.com/electrical/grounding.php


You can also get the all in one type and plug it into all your outlets to test: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000RUL2UU

u/Art_in_MT · 2 pointsr/HomeImprovement

I suggest proceeding VERY methodically. Two things I've found over the years:

  1. the GFI device is not always the first outlet on the circuit. Your power could be coming from another box "upstream", and

  2. for reasons only known to themselves, sometimes non-electricians will swap black-for-white. Thus, your next box might have been wired wrong (white is hot / screwed to brass), and "fixed" here because it was easier to get to. (Didn't want to move that 65 gallon aquarium.)

    I find one of these testers to be real handy when working on unknown wiring, and for checking my own after completion. LINK
u/Bill_Money · 2 pointsr/hometheater

Get somethign like this http://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1452385389&sr=8-1&keywords=outlet+tester make sure the outlet is wired correctly.

If it is then get a really good spurge suppressor possibly one with filtering

u/ichabod13 · 2 pointsr/videos

If the dishwasher is plugged into a outlet you can access, you can buy a cheap outlet tester like this one on Amazon
and see if your wiring is good. Sorry if this was already suggested somewhere. :P You can find the plug testers at any hardware store too.

u/umos199 · 2 pointsr/pcmasterrace

I would still test your home wiring. you can order things like this or find them at just about any store with an electrical section.

u/Vlad_the_Homeowner · 2 pointsr/homeowners

This is far cheaper than a single unnecessary GFCI receptacle:

https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1539193478&sr=8-3&keywords=circuit+tester

Every home owner should have one. Put it in, push button, it'll let you know if it's protected. As I posted above, receptacle needs to be GFCI protected, but there are more ways than one to do that. Not every outlet needs those two little buttons on it.

​

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u/SupaZT · 2 pointsr/teslamotors

Time to invest into a multimeter or Outlet Tester

u/Dippyskoodlez · 2 pointsr/pcmasterrace

The casing is for shielding, as at the end of the cable the pairs are untwisted and no longer individually shielded going into the RJ45 connector. It could potentially connect the ground from one device to another if it's wired into the shielding across the cable. It shouldn't be the cause of this issue though.

If you're feeling a shock it's because you have a grounding issue between your PC and the wall(or the outlet itself) and should get that checked out.

Perhaps check out something like this(If you're on 120v), it's possible your house/building wiring is FUBAR. I had a nice shock when I was connecting my parents fridge water hose to the fridge.

https://smile.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1487960559&sr=8-1&keywords=sperry+outlet+tester

u/SCphotog · 2 pointsr/computers

Make sure your computer is properly grounded. Make sure the outlet you're plugged into is wired correctly.

Ground tester... can be found at any hardware store, home depot etc... for just a few bucks.

Most uninterruptible power supply units these days have ground fault detection built in... and you should be using one regardless.

https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523144160&sr=8-1&keywords=ground+fault+tester

That aside, something shorted out. You have an exposed wire or something somewhere or the GPU is touching something that it shouldn't be.

u/Sillywillychille · 2 pointsr/electricians

I wouldn't assume that three prong outlet is properly wired, Someone could have just thrown it in there even if there isn't a ground wire ran to the box. You could buy a plug tester like this and it will tell you if it's wired correctly. It is possible someone could have wired the outlet to trick a tester into thinking there was a ground by jumping from the neutral to the ground.

Ultimately i would recommend having an electrician inspect the wiring in your house. Your houses original wiring is old and may not have a means to ground available at every outlet. I would find someone you can trust to take a look at everything, You don't know how many people, qualified or not, have worked in your home.

u/machu505 · 2 pointsr/hvacadvice

Perhaps a grounding/loose neutral issue. Or even a reversed hot/neutral. Use a circuit tester to test the outlet for faults if possible.

u/TheLostBryan · 2 pointsr/personalfinance

I use a gfci outlet tester. They are pretty cheap, and check that the wiring is as it should be (hot, neutral and ground in the right place). There is a button on it that will trip a gfci breaker to make sure it works as it should.

http://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU

u/Tude · 2 pointsr/fixit

This does a great job at detecting wiring faults and is cheap: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/

u/dstutz · 2 pointsr/woodworking

Waterlox should be great for the bathroom. If you have one of those outlet testers you could double check but if the electrician did it, it's probably fine.

u/skywise_ca · 2 pointsr/teslamotors

If you're pondering this because of the other post today and your outlet is 120V then this is what can test it.

https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1519597199&sr=8-1&keywords=outlet+tester&dpID=41lRWPMgkJL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

If it's a dryer outlet, it's probably fine if it has been doing it's normal job up to now.

u/PM_me_your_juicy_ass · 1 pointr/fixit

So it sounds like the outlets weren't grounded as someone already stated. The surge protector had nowhere to shunt any excess current to so it just went to your equipment. It's strange that your mother board was blown and not your power supply.

Nevertheless, I wouldn't plug a computer into any outlet unless I new it was grounded. If you do run an extension cord, there's three things to remember. Firstly, make sure the extension cord is a grounded one. Secondly, make sure the outlet is properly wired. Thirdly, make sure to make the cord as short as possible and don't cover it up with anything (rugs, carpet, etc.)

How do you check an outlet? The simplest method is to use a circuit tester. It's pretty cut and dry and it's a non-invasive way to make sure every wire is in the right place.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000RUL2UU/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1451367300&sr=1-1&pi=AC_SX220_SY330_FMwebp_QL65

u/sic0048 · 1 pointr/livesound

I'd recommend getting an inexpensive outlet/receptacle tester and testing any outlet that you will be plugging equipment into. If it doesn't test correctly, notify the staff at the building and don't use it. It's not the complete solution, but it is a great start.....

Something like this...... https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000RUL2UU/ref=s9_acsd_top_hd_bw_bxldN_c_x_1_w?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-3&pf_rd_r=HWWEYSS763CCFCJ6GS1R&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=e32b96c7-50a4-5f19-ae33-9408ab96b97e&pf_rd_i=14244461

u/lekryptoking2 · 1 pointr/NiceHash
u/KevPat23 · 1 pointr/askanelectrician

OP, here's an example of one

u/Cartossin · 1 pointr/audiophile

You should go to home depot and buy one of those plug tester devices. You plug it in your outlet and it says if it's wired wrong. I suspect the return is going through ground or something. Check all your outlets. This isn't just a case of "my power is really dirty". For it to be this bad, I think it's got to be wired totally wrong.

https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=outlet+tester&qid=1554167020&s=gateway&sr=8-3

Also you could run an extension cord and try an outlet from another room. Have you checked all your speaker wires to make sure they're not shorting?

u/SwingNinja · 1 pointr/DIY

Try hook the disposal directly to a regular outlet (use an extension cable). If there's nothing wrong with it, it should just be on shredding until you unplug it. To test the outlet itself, use a tester like this.

u/ahenkel · 1 pointr/pcmasterrace

https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU

Get one of these verify you have a ground issue. Then call an electrician.

u/BornOnFeb2nd · 1 pointr/HomeImprovement

This one is the apparently the top seller and it's on the cheaper side, and it does GFCI testing too.

Plug it in, you want to see two oranges. Nice and simple. It doesn't guarantee a true ground, but there's something that resembles one..

Other than that, you can pick 'em up anywhere... any will probably suffice If you've got a hardware store nearby, you can probably save a couple of bucks on 'em. the "official" name is a "Receptacle tester".

Careful though.. they're tricksy bastards! I've purchased something like 15-20 of them.. I couldn't tell you where a single one of them is right now....

u/NoGoodVeryBadDay · 1 pointr/videos

I can tell you that it's a bad ground for sure and a short somewhere in the dishwasher itself. The ground issue is either in the dishwasher itself or in the electrical system in your house. A simple plug tester like this http://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1449799157&sr=8-1&keywords=Plug+tester will tell you which one it is. Sorry for the long link, I don't know how to shorten them. If it's the dishwasher Bosch has a really good warranty and will send someone to your house to fix it. Until then unplug it because it could possibly cause a fire.

u/reallynotnick · 1 pointr/PS4Pro

Hmmmm, about all I can think of other than bad luck is either get a good surge protector if you don't have one or better yet a UPS as someone suggested. And while probably not super necessary having something like this isn't a bad idea to have on hand (this was just the first receptacle tester I found): https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_263_bs_lp_t_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=EE0D91J1R8YBHMQEW8P5

Otherwise I think it is just bad luck or someone is coming into your home and randomly breaking your PS4.

u/liquorsnoot · 1 pointr/pcgamingtechsupport

Good call. In preparation, you could test the outlet (if you've the means), and double check your video card connectors are clean, and that there's no hint of burnt smell anywhere.

u/anthonyalmighty · 1 pointr/HomeMaintenance

You can pickup a simple outlet test tool for very, very cheap: https://smile.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488298170&sr=8-1&keywords=GFCI+test

I have one and use one to service homes new and old to test for common wiring fault problems. This could help you eliminate wiring issues from the problem.

u/ocdtrekkie · 1 pointr/DIY

There's a couple handy tools you'll want.

A receptacle tester: https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU makes it easy to see if your GFCI outlet is A. wired correctly and B. trips properly. A perk here, is you can also use this tester to see if your normal outlet is chained to a GFCI outlet or on a GFCI breaker, as they'll trip just as well if you use the test button on this tool.

Actually, you can get both in one: https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-STK001-Non-Contact-Receptacle/dp/B002JGQAQ6 but you want something handy to check if a wire is live. After I believe I've turned off a circuit, I test it a couple times, usually going to a live circuit too to make sure the tester is also working. I want to be super confident before I touch it.

And yeah, I usually never do electrical work without a friend present, just in case I do something dumb. Never work with electrical alone if you can avoid it.

u/Canuhandleit · 1 pointr/malelivingspace

Also, get a continuity tester. That way you can tell if the outlet is hot or wired correctly. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_v3G-BbNR3T6V6

u/SeahawkerLBC · 1 pointr/buildapc

Well I'm going to pick up one of these today and check out all my outlets

https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1541514953&sr=8-3&keywords=Tester+AC+Outlet

Between the two, would you get an AVR or UPS? My computer is 400w with maybe another 100w with peripherals and monitor.

u/Tippytom · 1 pointr/electricians

the only thing you can do as a tenant is get a receptacle tester then you can give your landlord more info on the problem

u/Halfinchsoul · 1 pointr/electricians

This sounds like a shielding problem, you can buy a cheap receptacle tester to tell you if you have problems with the wiring in your home.

https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1487102109&sr=8-3&keywords=receptacle+tester

u/JDT0962 · 1 pointr/instantpot

Not to fear-monger (too much) but if you saw something glowing orange in that socket, then you have narrowly averted a fire. What you smelled *was* burnt plastic and maybe wire insulation. You may not have had a flaming fire but do not misunderstand - you came very close to a potential house fire.

Any electric heating element pulls a LOT of current and can cause overheating/fires. I'm in the US but I'm also sure CA has similar electrical requirements to prevent disasters. I'd guess that something is wrong with that particular circuit, or possibly multiple circuits. The breaker/fuse should have tripped before it reached a situation that could cause a fire. Things to check would be the rating of the breaker on that circuit (it may not be matched to the wire of the circuit) or for too many devices on the circuit (or combinations of the above). If you wanted to check the current required by your pot, you can buy a "Watt meter" at your local big box supply store or online. "Kill-A-Watt" is one popular brand and they run about $20-25 USD. At this point, I'd strongly suggest that you have an electrician or someone fully knowledgeable inspect your breaker panel and house wiring to be certain that you are safe going forward. You'll need to immediately replace that receptacle as well so maybe pay someone to do that and check things while they are there.

I'd also check the polarity of the wiring and the grounds at every outlet - you can find polarity checkers cheap like this one: https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU.

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Finally note that GFCI outlets have nothing to do with high-wattage appliances. GFCI means Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter - they are mandated to be used when any outlet is within the proximity of a sink, hose, etc. - water of any kind. They would break the power to the circuit in the event of a ground fault that could cause you to be electrocuted. Test these periodically as they do sometimes go back and loose their protective qualities.

Hope this helps - be safe.

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u/ljrochon · 1 pointr/explainlikeimfive

Buy one of these

https://www.amazon.ca/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1519793985&sr=8-2&keywords=outlet+tester+gfci

plug it in to each outlet until you find the problem. If all the outlets check out you may have an issue with a switch or a light fixture. Or just call an electrician. A/C is not for the inexperienced and will kill you.

u/ctmurray · 1 pointr/applehelp

Well it has to be something with the electricity in the house, and the chargers are smart enough to sense that and not work (I guess). There is a device you can plug into outlets that can detect issues (really long link below). This is a very useful, cheap, tool that you will use several times over the decades you live/own a home.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sxr_zg_dy_1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=3525596382&pd_rd_wg=OOxLD&pf_rd_r=25QHY3ETGE3FYBZQ6PF0&pf_rd_s=desktop-rhs-carousels&pf_rd_t=301&pd_rd_i=B000RUL2UU&pd_rd_w=cmB9C&pf_rd_i=electrical+tester&pd_rd_r=c6e22401-47d8-437c-8bcf-4a91ca469380&ie=UTF8&qid=1523146792&sr=1

u/Agent_X10 · 1 pointr/OSHA

Get one of these devices. It'll tell you how screwed up your outlets are.

http://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Outlet-Tester/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=pd_bxgy_328_img_3

Any hardware store has these, no need to order from amazon, or any particular brand.

u/Spungo1 · 1 pointr/electricians

Try to buy cheap junk from Walmart or Amazon until you know exactly what you want. You don't need a $60 pair of pliers or a $300 drill when you're learning.

  • Safety glasses

  • Linesman pliers (high leverage pliers that can also cut wires)

  • Diagonal cutting pliers (wire cutters)

  • Long reach needle nose pliers

  • Wire strippers.

  • 25 foot tape measure

  • Hammer

  • Multimeter that can check voltage and resistance. It doesn't need to be accurate.

  • Receptacle tester that looks like this

  • No contact voltage tester like this

  • A magnetic dish for holding screws. Seriously. Losing screws is not fun. A big magnet can also be useful if you drop a bunch of screws or nails on the floor.

  • Ziplock bags. I always end up needing bags for things. A small bag full of clean napkins is a great thing to have.

  • Knife with a sheepsfoot blade like this

  • Tool box. Get one that is big and cheap. I paid $10 for mine and it holds everything listed above.
u/Dark_24 · 1 pointr/buildapc

How much per kWh does your electricity cost? 19 Cents per Kilowatthour?

https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/epm_table_grapher.php?t=epmt_5_6_a



It really does not sound like the PC is causing this..

You said you purchased an electricity usage monitor?

What did it read? what is it currently reading? You should keep it hooked up so you can get an over time look at your power usage..

Your PC should not cost more than about $15 -$20 a month to run MAX..

It can not even imagine a faulty PSU causing this.. and if it was a power strip it should have blown up by now and burned your house down..

You could get a outlet tester: like this
https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1511526107&sr=8-3&keywords=outlet+tester&tag=gamersnexus01-20

To make sure you do not have a faulty outlet..

What you can do is hook up the Kill-A-Watt meter and put your PC to sleep see if the Power Supply is still drawing that god awful amount of power.. and Check your monitor make sure the power brick is not faulty..

That kind of power would generate a LOT of heat your room should be a sauna if it is the PC

If you check your PC parts Picker it is showing your Power draw at
36W to 146W max..

https://www.pcmag.com/article/343177/how-to-measure-home-power-usage

Watts / 1000 * Hours used x (Cost per Kilowatt-hour)= Total Cost..

Your PC Max should be about 146W + 30W for the monitor MAX

Intel - Core i5-6500 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor 8W - 65W

MSI - H110M Gaming Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard 15W - 60W

Avexir - Core Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory 11W - 11W

Crucial - MX300 750GB 2.5" Solid State Drive 2W - 10W

Monitor is 30W

So do the math 176W

176/1000 = .176 of a Kilowatt

  • say $.19 (cost per kWh) so $.033 per hour
  • say 16 hours a day thats about 54 cents a day..
  • 30 days is about $16

    Say your PC uses 350 watts, including monitor, while playing a graphically-intensive game, and your kWh cost is $0.19. If you were to play for one hour straight, it would cost you:

    350 / 1000 * 0.19 = $0.07 per hour

    Lets say for arguments sake you used all 550W of your Power supply + Monitor 30W that would be 580W 10 cents per hour or $1.76 per day or about $53 a month.. MAX and your PC should be pumping out enough heat to make you sweat. ( Not to mention your Power Supply would not last very long )

    This still does NOT account for the increase in your bill... It is NOT the PC it can NOT be the PC

    Hook a Kill-A-Watt meter to the PC and give us the numbers..

    If it is over 100 Watts while your doing nothing there is a problem..

    If it is over 350 Watts while your working there is a problem..


u/brightlights_bigsky · 1 pointr/electricians

Couple thoughts. Is there maybe a problem with wiring? I would get one of these and try all the plugs to see if you have an issue like a bad ground. There are others that look like this one, but most will not give you as good of a test. Sperry Receptacle Tester ($8) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_hg-rDb7HMV8WX

For a good whole house protection from a unit like the Square D HEPD80, its common to run into issues with placement. I like using the EATON CHSPT2ULTRA, but similar specs. Its a little more difficult, but I have run them outside directly through the back of the breaker panel to a small metal wall box on the outside. Little more work, but this keeps the leads short (important) and even lets me check on the surge protector LEDs very easily). They normally have something like this at HD/Lowes - here is something similar: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005T5BRO4/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_tr-rDbAYB73ZJ

u/ClassyClassic76 · 1 pointr/ValveIndex

There are relatively cheap meters designed specifically for testing wiring. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RUL2UU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_8a1sDb0156PJ9

u/tmwrnj · 1 pointr/Guitar

Use an IEC splitter cable with a clip-on ferrite. The IEC splitter allows you to neatly wire up all of your power supplies from a single cable. You can fix it in place on your pedalboard, so you'll only need to plug in a single power cable to run all of your Pedal Power units. The ferrite will help dissipate RF interference coming from the mains wiring.

While you're at it, get yourself an outlet tester and a GFCI - it could save your life.

u/[deleted] · 0 pointsr/HomeImprovement

Everyone says it's a some fix. It might be. I'd want to plug in a circuit tester, and open one box up by removing the plug to see what's behind it.

https://www.amazon.com/Sperry-Instruments-GFI6302-Receptacle-Professional/dp/B000RUL2UU/

The whole house could have wiring issues. Or a bad plug.

u/macbrett · -1 pointsr/apple

Get a hold of an inexpensive outlet tester. Most hardware stores have them. If your grounded outlet wiring is screwed up (like the neutral and hot wires are switched) this will show it.