Reddit Reddit reviews Starting Strength

We found 73 Reddit comments about Starting Strength. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Starting Strength
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73 Reddit comments about Starting Strength:

u/todayislegday · 317 pointsr/Fitness

Welcome!

You could probably benefit from reading the wiki.

This is my /r/fitness guide for people with generic fitness goals. It isn't the only way to go about it but everything in it is frequently recommended by people in /r/fitness:

  • Try and get in the mindset that this is for the rest of your life. You won't be doing exactly this forever but you will be doing something like it forever.
  • Choose a good gym and start Stronglifts. Stronglifts v1 is also worth a read, as is Starting Strength.
  • The pull/chin up & dip accessories in Stronglifts v1 and/or the Stronglifts apps are recommended if you want to accentuate your arms and back.
  • If you can't get your own equipment or join a gym then read the /r/bodyweightfitness wiki and start one of the Beginner Routines.
  • If you want to improve your cardio then start Couch to 5K. You could also find a sport you love and do that. Yoga is good for stretching and mild cardio.
  • Do bodyweight squats, hamstring stretches and chest stretches 2-3 times per day to increase your flexibility for lifting. For more advanced stretching see Starting Stretching and Molding Mobility.
  • Estimate your bodyfat then calculate your TDEE using the Katch-Mc-Cardle formula.
  • Subtract between 500 kCal and 20% of your TDEE to lose weight or up to 30% if your BMI is over 32. Add 200-500 kCal to gain weight & muscle. Use MyFitnessPal to ensure you hit that caloric goal each day.
  • Get from 0.68 to 1.2 grams of protein per day per pound of lean body mass (body weight – (body weight x body fat percentage)). Anything over 1.2g/lb is probably not beneficial.
  • Create your own menus based on foods you know and like. You won't get it perfectly right at first but you will learn the nutritional contents of foods, knowledge that will be useful for the rest of your life. Eat mostly fresh food you prepare yourself. It's usually better for fibre and micro nutrients.
  • DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) may be a problem for the first week or two, but your body will adapt quickly if you don’t skip workouts and you will not longer get DOMS.
  • Consistency is key. You do not need to be motivated. Motivation is fleeting and cannot be relied upon. Workouts are like grocery shopping or brushing your teeth - it's just something you have to do.
  • If you're at the gym and really not “feeling it” focus on the fact that the best way to get out of there is to complete your workout as efficiently as possible. Better form and focus will get it done that much quicker.
  • You will not get more ripped/muscled/bigger than you want to. That takes effort, time and intention. You will not wake up one day and be accidentally Arnold.

    Stronglifts is a beginner program designed to maximise your strength gains in a relatively safe way and increase the chances you'll follow the program by being relatively easy to learn and follow. It isn't meant to be followed forever though.

    Progress guide to Stronglifts:

  • If you successfully complete an exercises sets with good form add 2.5kg/5lb to that exercise on the next workout (5kg/10lb on deadlifts until you hit 100kg/225lb, then 2.5kg/5lb).
  • If you can't complete your sets with good form repeat the same weight for that exercise next workout.
  • If you try the same weight three times in a row and can't complete it on the third then deload 10% for the next workout and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload for that exercise switch to either 3x5 or 3x3 and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3x5 switch to 3x3.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3x3 switch to an intermediate program that matches your goals.

    Ignore anyone who tells you at what weights these things should happen. Just follow the program. Your body can do what it can do, trying to match an average or macho idea of what you "should" be able to do instead of what you can do will just get you injured and/or stalling.

    If you want to track the changes in your body measure your weight, shoulders, biceps, calves, chest, forearms, hips, neck, waist and thighs, flexed and/or unflexed or whatever combination of those you care about.

  • Record each measurement every day.
  • Create an average for each measurement for the entire week. MFPExport.nl is good for this with weight.

    Learn to ignore the daily measurements - they will mislead you as to your actual progress and send you on an emotional rollercoaster. The weekly trend tells you what's what.

    People often regret not taking enough photos of their progress. Take photos from more than one angle regularly in consistent conditions (lighting, time of day, clothing, pose).

    Useful form videos:

    Bench Press

  • Buff Dudes (great for beginners)
  • Jennifer Thompson
  • Untamed Strength (great advice with a great beard)
  • Crossfit
  • Rippetoe
  • So You Think You Can Bench Press (comprehensive)

    Deadlift

  • Buff Dudes (great for beginners)
  • Untamed Strength (the beard... she speaks to me)
  • Rippetoe
  • Candito on avoiding common injuries
  • Candito on activating lats
  • So You Think You Can Deadlift (comprehensive)

    Squats

  • Buff Dudes (beginners)
  • Omar's Friend Alastair (clarifications for beginners)
  • Untamed Strength (this beard is your beard, this beard is my beard)
  • Rippetoe
  • Candito
  • Candito's form fixes (high bar but applies to low bar)
  • So You Think You Can Squat (comprehensive)

    Pendlay/Barbell Rows

  • Buff Dudes
  • FitnessDudes
  • Pendlay

    Overhead Press

  • Buff Dudes (beginners)
  • Untamed Strength (you should consider having sex with a bearded man)
  • Rippetoe
  • 70's Big form fixes
u/combovercool · 39 pointsr/educationalgifs

The squat is so hot right now, but the deadlift is the most "functional" lift you can do.

Starting Strength is a great book for learning how to lift weights.

u/Overhead_Deadlift · 27 pointsr/AskReddit

Don't worry about getting judged in the gym, everyone is doing their own thing and people are happy to help you out.

Take a look at the FAQ of r/fitness. Especially the diet section. Learn about macro- and micronutrients. This is good as well

Free weights are better than machines. You don't need a squat rack to do bicep curls. Use a weight that's appropriate, you are not there to impress anyone.

You don't need a fuckton of supplements, fix your diet first. Instead of spending your cash on testosterone boosters and fat burners consider buying the Starting Strength e-book. Even if you don't want to do that program, the book is great and it explains the essential lifts in detail. Take the diet advice with a grain rock of salt though.

Track your weight, wether your goal is to gain or to lose. Weigh yourself every morning after taking a piss and take a weekly average, weight can fluctuate on a daily basis. Also track your calories (buy a foodscale). Even if you don't want to do that forever, at least do it for a few weeks so you actually know how much energy the food you consume provides. People claiming they can't lose or gain weight because of their metabolism are lying.

Track your lifts. Don't create your own program. Build a habit of going to the gym because motivation will come and go. Take progress pictures because the mirror will not show you the minor changes you make on a daily basis. More is not always besser. Use your rest days for stretching, light cardio and rest. You will have bad days in the gym. It happens. A bad workout is still better than no workout.

Relevant subreddits:

u/cauchy37 · 24 pointsr/progresspics

For body weight exercises, like pull-up, chin-up, dip, push-up the best route is do negatives at first, and slowly increase number of reps. Basically all of these have the same program (with different numbers) that will lead you from not being able to do single rep, to doing more than enough.

Have a look at:

http://www.50pullups.com/ - for pull-ups

http://www.onefiftydips.com/ - for dips

http://hundredpushups.com/ for push-ups


For clean, jerk and other olympic lifts, you'd better to start with something like Starting Strength or Strong Lifts 5x5 and after finishing it, go from there.

u/cleti · 21 pointsr/Fitness

>I've read the FAQ and most essential pieces of info here on fittit, though I find not much seems to apply to me since I am so short and skinny and honestly weak, and my metabolism is very high and I'm vegetarian etc

Bullshit. My nine-year-old brother can only overhead press 25lbs, bench press 35lbs, squat 65lbs and deadlift 85lbs (all for 5). He's still training with a barbell. Don't use the fact that you are currently weak as an excuse to stay weak. You're fighting against yourself.

If you want to be strong/weigh more you need to train consistently and eat. As a vegetarian, things like rice, beans and potatoes are your best friend. They're cheap and can be bought in bulk. Eat A LOT. Buy Starting Strength. Read the hell out of it. Pick a novice program (Starting Strength, StrongLifts 5x5 or Greyskull LP) and follow them and become bigger and stronger.

Good luck. I wish you well.

Edit: Formatting

u/LoCHiF · 17 pointsr/Fitness

Welcome!

You could probably benefit from reading the wiki.

This is my /r/fitness guide for people with generic fitness goals. It isn't the only way to go about it but everything in it is frequently recommended by people in /r/fitness:

  • Try and get in the mindset that this is for the rest of your life. You won't be doing exactly this forever but you will be doing something like it forever.
  • Choose a good gym and start Stronglifts. Stronglifts v1 is also worth a read, as is Starting Strength.
  • The pull/chin up & dip accessories in Stronglifts v1 and/or the Stronglifts apps are recommended if you want to accentuate your arms and back.
  • If you can't get your own equipment or join a gym then read the /r/bodyweightfitness wiki and start one of the Beginner Routines.
  • If you want to improve your cardio then start Couch to 5K. You could also find a sport you love and do that. Yoga is good for stretching and mild cardio.
  • Do bodyweight squats, hamstring stretches and chest stretches 2-3 times per day to increase your flexibility for lifting. For more advanced stretching see Starting Stretching and Molding Mobility.
  • Estimate your bodyfat then calculate your TDEE using the Katch-Mc-Cardle formula.
  • Subtract between 500 kCal and 20% of your TDEE to lose weight or up to 30% if your BMI is over 32. Add 200-500 kCal to gain weight & muscle. Use MyFitnessPal to ensure you hit that caloric goal each day.
  • Get from 0.68 to 1.2 grams of protein per day per pound of lean body mass (body weight – (body weight x body fat percentage)). Anything over 1.2g/lb is probably not beneficial.
  • Create your own menus based on foods you know and like. You won't get it perfectly right at first but you will learn the nutritional contents of foods, knowledge that will be useful for the rest of your life. Eat mostly fresh food you prepare yourself. It's usually better for fibre and micro nutrients.
  • DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) may be a problem for the first week or two, but your body will adapt quickly if you don’t skip workouts and you will not longer get DOMS.
  • Consistency is key. You do not need to be motivated. Motivation is fleeting and cannot be relied upon. Workouts are like grocery shopping or brushing your teeth - it's just something you have to do.
  • If you're at the gym and really not “feeling it” focus on the fact that the best way to get out of there is to complete your workout as efficiently as possible. Better form and focus will get it done that much quicker.
  • You will not get more ripped/muscled/bigger than you want to. That takes effort, time and intention. You will not wake up one day and be accidentally Arnold.

    Stronglifts is a beginner program designed to maximise your strength gains in a relatively safe way and increase the chances you'll follow the program by being relatively easy to learn and follow. It isn't meant to be followed forever though.

    Progress guide to Stronglifts:

  • If you successfully complete an exercises sets with good form add 2.5kg/5lb to that exercise on the next workout (5kg/10lb on deadlifts until you hit 100kg/225lb, then 2.5kg/5lb).
  • If you can't complete your sets with good form repeat the same weight for that exercise next workout.
  • If you try the same weight three times in a row and can't complete it on the third then deload 10% for the next workout and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload for that exercise switch to either 3x5 or 3x3 and use the same progression as before.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3x5 switch to 3x3.
  • When you get to a second deload at 3x3 switch to an intermediate program that matches your goals.

    Ignore anyone who tells you at what weights these things should happen. Just follow the program. Your body can do what it can do, trying to match an average or macho idea of what you "should" be able to do instead of what you can do will just get you injured and/or stalling.

    If you want to track the changes in your body measure your weight, shoulders, biceps, calves, chest, forearms, hips, neck, waist and thighs, flexed and/or unflexed or whatever combination of those you care about.

  • Record each measurement every day.
  • Create an average for each measurement for the entire week. MFPExport.nl is good for this with weight.

    Learn to ignore the daily measurements - they will mislead you as to your actual progress and send you on an emotional rollercoaster. The weekly trend tells you what's what.

    People often regret not taking enough photos of their progress. Take photos from more than one angle regularly in consistent conditions (lighting, time of day, clothing, pose).

    Useful form videos:

    Bench Press

  • Buff Dudes (great for beginners)
  • Jennifer Thompson
  • Untamed Strength (great advice with a great beard)
  • Crossfit
  • Rippetoe
  • So You Think You Can Bench Press (comprehensive)

    Deadlift

  • Buff Dudes (great for beginners)
  • Untamed Strength (the beard... she speaks to me)
  • Rippetoe
  • Candito on avoiding common injuries
  • Candito on activating lats
  • So You Think You Can Deadlift (comprehensive)

    Squats

  • Buff Dudes (beginners)
  • Omar's Friend Alastair (clarifications for beginners)
  • Untamed Strength (this beard is your beard, this beard is my beard)
  • Rippetoe
  • Candito
  • Candito's form fixes (high bar but applies to low bar)
  • So You Think You Can Squat (comprehensive)

    Pendlay/Barbell Rows

  • Buff Dudes
  • FitnessDudes
  • Pendlay
  • Untamed Strength (Beardin, God of Beards)

    Overhead Press

  • Buff Dudes (beginners)
  • Untamed Strength (you should consider having sex with a bearded man)
  • Rippetoe
  • 70's Big form fixes
u/cracell · 10 pointsr/funny

I've been weight lifting for bulk for the last 4 months or so and I eat as much as my stomach can handle and it's still not quite enough.

I've never been a heavy person but if you want to lose weight and still eat progressively loading barbells is the way to go. Takes a ton of calories to grow muscle.

I don't understand why so many weight loss programs push the cardio, that method totally works but just lifting weights for strength building seems like the far easier routine with lots of bonuses.

u/jedi_stannis · 8 pointsr/weightroom

Buy Starting Strength. It has in depth explanation of the basic barbell lifts (Squat, Bench, Deadlift, Overhead Press, Power Clean). Your form is probably incorrect all around (At 230 with correct form you should be able to bench more than 100 untrained).

It also contains the routine to follow. No more machines.

u/davidarowe · 7 pointsr/ProtectAndServe

So, everyone telling you to do cardio is wrong. Objectively so, but they're not doing it out of spite or malice... they're doing it because they don't know any better either. They did what they did, and for a lot of them it was good enough, but the real question is... was it the best and most efficient thing to do? "Cardio," as it's commonly referred to, is really slow, steady-state aerobic training or exercise. It is absolutely not going to help you for two main reasons: 1) You are overweight and deconditioned and 2) you are going into a job where being able to run 10+ miles is NOT a significant factor. Being able to move quickly, hand-to-hand, load bearing equipment/duty load, carrying or moving heavy objects or people, movement to contact runs, getting into various positions, shooting, moving yourself through a three dimensional environment, etc. ARE all tasks you face.

​

So what should you do about it? Well, to start off you should get strong. As strong as you can, and do so while eating enough to maintain your training (but NOT enough that you don't slowly lose a LITTLE body fat). Body composition, not body weight, is important. The BMI index is garbage past people who never do anything physical and use their diet to manage their body fat. They're the mopeds of the metabolic world. You don't want to be a moped... you want to be a fighter jet. Not only will the ability to produce force help you across damn near every single job task you have to do (including helping keep your back/joints from being beat to shit before you're 30), but it is the adaptation that takes the longest to attain with the most dedication of energy and resources (time, food, rest). Once you get strong, and as you approach your academy date (2-3 months out), start to titrate in your conditioning load to your strength training. You should focus most on HIIT for your conditioning, as this will be the most effective use of your time. The majority of adaptation for conditioning happens at the cellular level, so you will probably be in tremendously good condition for any law enforcement or military physical fitness test in 8-10 weeks. The strength you gained ahead of time will allow you to run faster, bear more load, subdue people more easily, control situations by physical presence and confidence and will also assist your conditioning work as an important component of endurance.

​

I hope you take my recommendation seriously. If you would like explanations, examples, studies, etc. I can provide them, but know that while I do not have law enforcement experience I did spend a LOT of time in the Marine Corps working for a particular community. I know that strength works, and I know that HIIT conditioning works. Mostly because I did it every possible way you could think of, and in retrospect I would throw every other thing I ever did out the window and strength training with conditioning as a supplemental. Strength served me best, in every capacity, through multiple deployments to Afghanistan as a Marine and civilian contractor, on fitness tests, on the range/shoot house/MOUT town, etc. If you're ready to stop exercising, stop wasting your time and energy, and start training... I recommend you start here. I am also training to apply for FLEO, so if you would like an accountability partner let me know. I cannot mentor you with police stuff, but I do have friends in law enforcement who do everything from large SWAT teams to CSI to FBI Special Agent.

​

Edit: I screwed up some words.

u/[deleted] · 7 pointsr/NoFap

You're on to something here. Developing new hobbies is vital, I've found. It's been a huge help forgetting about PMO because I've got to do Starting Strength and play Hearthstone!

u/yamichi · 6 pointsr/swoleacceptance

I'll throw out there the Gospel according to Rippetoe. It was a very literal life changer for me.

u/PepperJck · 5 pointsr/Fitness

The guy who made it brilliant and very well known. Fads come and go. The douche follow the fad for a superior bro feeling. Just do you and don't worry about anyone else. The body build route is safer since its mostly lighter weights so a lot of lifers prefer them to something that could sideline them for weeks. SS is a great program to get going on until you figure out what you like.

u/SupurSAP · 5 pointsr/gainit

People have suggested learning the correct form and I have to emphasize what they said.. especially before loading up that barbell. Eff that machine non-sense because a lot of those isolate muscle groups.. this isn't a bad thing necessarily but you'll get more from those compounds early on.

​

A resource that I enjoyed when I first started out was Starting Strength by Mark Ripptoe (if you're old school like me and prefer a good book this is it). YouTube videos are good too but I do not have any references that come to mind... Will edit later if they come to me.

u/vtkayaker · 5 pointsr/gainit

A typical setup might be something like 2×45, 2×25, 4×10, 2×5 and 2×2.5. If you want to reach 225 or more on any lift, you could also add an extra 2×45.

For working on the bench press, I'd also consider looking for 2×1.25 or a set of fractional plates. These aren't mandatory but they're nice. I have this set here and I love it. This is useful because if you put 1.25 on each side of the bar, it increases the total weight by 2.5 pounds, allowing you to improve your bench by 2.5 pounds each workout. If all you have is 2×2.5, you need to go up in 5 pound jumps, which is fine in the beginning, but harder as you get stronger. I'm currently at 160 for 3 sets of 5, and I can currently add 2.5 more per workout with the same rep scheme. If I tried to go up by 5, I'd stall and I'd need to mess with a more complicated rep scheme. More gyms should have fractional plates!

Also, if you're new to lifting, I recommend looking at a good beginner program. Two popular choices are Starting Strength and Strong Lifts. Either of these will show you how to get a lot stronger quickly, using good technique, and will answer hundreds of questions. They also both have good apps.

u/chris_was_taken · 4 pointsr/Fitness

Whether or not you get someone random to teach you at the gym, invest in a copy of Starting Strength. I like the paperback version at about $20. It goes into incredible detail about all the major movements. Like seriously 30 pages or something on just deadlift, with tons of diagrams, talk about angles, how it should feel, etc.

I go to a gym where qualified trainers coach me through these movements and I still refer back to the book. It will fuel your love for these movements and conquer their nuances.

u/matthewbuza_com · 4 pointsr/fasting

I get the fear. Here’s a great book if you want to geek out on proper form. The key is to try and find someone who will work with you (don’t do it alone). A trainer is a good option, but if you feel nervous there are tons of options to go that’s not barbell lifting. Good HIIT training routines with kettlebells, battle ropes, and body weight suspension bands can do wonders. Good luck!

u/babygainz · 4 pointsr/Fitness

For a true beginner, I would suggest Starting Strength. 5/3/1 is best to try after your have exhausted linear gains seen in SS. Get the book Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. It explains the movements in detail and gives you a structured routine to follow.

It's on kindle.

u/Johnny_Lawless_Esq · 4 pointsr/xxfitness

Starting Strength. It's mentioned in the FAQ, but what the FAQ doesn't really touch on is how the book is written for the specific purpose of teaching people how to do barbell lifts without a trainer and without a spotter.

u/shupack · 3 pointsr/Fitness
  1. most likely.

  2. it boils down to calories in - calories out <= 0 your body-fat is a spare fuel tank, if you don't eat all the calories your body burns in a day, your body will use a little bit of fat to make up the deficit. do this almost every day, and your fat stores will shrink to a "normal" level. low-carb diets help fill you up faster and keep you full longer, so it is easier to eat at a deficit without trying. I lost 25lbs on /r/keto in 3 months. I had to up my carb intake to be able to get enough calories when I started lifting in June, on low-carb I couldn't physically fit that much food into my stomach AND digest it all.

  3. more medieval torture racks. when will you do a leg-curl in your normal daily routine? ever see a monkey do anything like it? When will you do a dead-lift in your daily routine? (hint: every time you pick something up from the floor, or something big, it's a variation of the DL.)
    Do the big 5 lifts for a couple months, when you find a weak-link, add in accessory exercises, which may or may not be on the torture racks.

  • Squat
  • Dead Lift
  • Bench Press
  • Press
  • Powercleans/rows

    You'll work every muscle in the body, be in the gym about an hour. download stronglifts 5x5 and/or StartingStrength, pick one, go. Re-evaluate when your squat hits 250x5.

  1. REST!! with increased activity your body will be re-building. You need to sleep more for much needed recovery time. particularly the first few months when you're making big noob gains. also, remember that it didn't take a week to get to your unhappy place. it take more than a week to get to your happy place.

  2. not long, the body is incredibly adaptable. look at how well it adapted to being lazy and over-eating!

    Source: 3 months following Starting Strength, started after 3 months on keto. 37M, 5'10 195lbs to 170 on keto, 170-182lbs(current weight) with lifting, belly is still shrinking, lifts are going up.
u/all_i_do_is_lurk · 3 pointsr/fitnesscirclejerk

Have you seen this? Same thing, no piracy: $9.99

u/jonib0ni · 3 pointsr/bodyweightfitness

Lift heavy weights, eat a lot, sleep a lot.

https://www.amazon.de/Starting-Strength-English-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1538156529&sr=8-2&keywords=starting+strength

I highly recommend reading the book and doing the Starting Strength program as laid out. Has worked for literally everyone who has done it properly.

u/Veritas76 · 3 pointsr/askMRP

It is great to hear you have made it through 5th week mark. It means the habit is probably a little bit ingrained into your life style. That is a huge victory.

Speaking of the injuries, try to minimaze them by having a good form. It is easy to say, hard to acchieve though. The strenght training is a long term activity, take your time ..

I have been lifiting for some time (still sticking with 5x5) and the form perfection is a neverending story. I bought [Starting strength] (https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1483370221&sr=1-1&keywords=starting+strength) book two days ago. It is a good book adressing the barb bell lifts (100+ pages about squat etc.) in order to get better technique. The book is very detailed and I tend to skip pages, it is a great source nevertheless.

u/nx_2000 · 3 pointsr/CasualConversation

You don't need to ingest special stuff to lift weights. The bible of weightlifting, Starting Strength, doesn't even mention it IIRC. Lifting heavy things is about the best exercise there is.

u/kasittig · 3 pointsr/xxfitness

Hey - I noticed that you said that you're interested in getting stronger. Have you considered doing a strength training program? Good programs will answer these sorts of questions for you so that you don't have to worry.

I'm doing Starting Strength, but Stronglifts 5x5 is another really popular beginner program. Either way, I would definitely recommend getting the Starting Strength book - it has a lot of great tips about form, which is super useful if you're just starting out!

u/orcishlifter · 3 pointsr/fatlogic

Buy and read this (can be read on your computer if you truly have no device capable of running the Kindle software). https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA

DON'T DRINK THE MILK (that advice is for skinny teens that don't know how to add muscle mass).

Otherwise you can follow Starting Strength (SS) for a good long time and get linear gains. Nothing else really compiles the biomechanical break down of all the lifts in one place and it's a pretty safe way to go about the big, scary lifts if you don't feel like you know what you're doing.

u/Hotblack_Desiato_ · 2 pointsr/xxfitness

I'm adding my voice to the "Starting Strength" chorus. Get the book. Yes, it's a lot of information. Simple fact is, any three pages of Starting Strength contain more real, actual, useful information than almost any other whole book about fitness.

Watch this series of videos before you read it, and you'll have some context that'll make the book more approachable. You'll also get the bonus of hearing Mark Rippetoe's voice in your head as you read, which is always entertaining.

u/seattle-is-aight · 2 pointsr/Fitness

This is what Mark Rippetoe has to say about training younger people:

> I have no problems with children lifting weights and barbells, doing the Olympic lifts, squats deadlifts, presses, bench presses, sprints, or any other correct and properly coached classic weight training or conditioning movement. There is absolutely no physiological reason not to let them train properly. I have a problem with structured training for children who should probably be encouraged to just play. If they can regard the weight room as a fun place to be, let them play there as long as they are doing the exercises with technical perfection.

The key here is performing the exercises correctly.

You will NOT stunt your growth. This is a rampant myth. Barbell training infact is one of the safest forms of exercise. You are much more likely to stunt your growth playing sports like soccer, unless if you do something like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1m6vcyQqx_Q

Here's a good starting point on the squat: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhVC_AnZYYM

Read the entire booking Starting Strength, 3rd edition: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

It's only dangerous if you are performer the lifts incorrectly. Take videos of your form and post them and ask people to critique for feedback.

Most importantly, BE WARY of advice people give you. There is a TON of misinformation about lifting, and you're going to get a lot of people spreading this information to you because they see you as someone who is younger and thus they need to 'educate' you. Study what the most experienced strength coaches in the world have to say (such as Mark Rippetoe).

u/Dest123 · 2 pointsr/MMFB

The easiest way to increase your confidence with women is by working out. It's weirdly not even because it makes you look better or anything, I think there's just some chemical that your body releases when you're working out that makes you more confident. Either that or maybe it's just the empowering feeling that you're improving yourself. Either way, if you haven't worked out before, Starting Strength and their book are great explanations of basic strength training. If gyms are too expensive, you can also google body weight exercises and find a bunch of stuff.

The hard part about working out is really just making it a habit. If you force yourself to work out for 2-3 weeks, you'll start loving it and it will be easy to keep going.

Hobbies are also a good way to increase your self confidence and general happiness. Do you have any hobbies/things your passionate about? Could be especially useful if those hobbies could turn into an actual job.

Dancing lessons are a great way to interact with girls and get more comfortable around them. It doesn't matter if you're a terrible dancer, because everyone else will be too. Most towns have salsa lessons, and some have swing or tango. The first lesson is terrifying, but after that it's easy.

The book of pook is also a really good "book" about getting better with women without all the TRP bullshit.

Really, the overall thing is just to come up with stuff that you think will make your life better, and then try to do it.

I'm also pretty sure you can report that lawyer to the bar association. It might save someone else from getting screwed over by him.

u/janeshep · 2 pointsr/italy

Se vuoi una guida completa e dettagliata su come fare i fondamentali (stacco, squat, panca piana, military press e power clean) leggiti Starting Strength di Rippetoe. È praticamente una guida precisissima su come farli. Non avrai bisogno di altro per tanti anni.

https://www.amazon.it/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_mEvYDbKWKZBSS

u/StonedGiraffe · 2 pointsr/Fitness

Practical Programming

or

Starting Strength

Practical Programming is more in-depth. Both of these are your best bet. New gym is necessary.

u/wang-bang · 2 pointsr/StartingStrength

You need to squat deeper.

Also look over your shoes. Your legs wobbled a lot. I cant see the shoes but it seems like what happens when you have runners shoes on. I've seen it before.

Also you need to move the squat rack away from the wall a little and then look over the book to get the eye gaze right.

After that you only have to think about taking a deep breath at the top, and making sure you push your chest out. Its a very bad idea to flex your spine when lifting. It should be in the same position at the top as the bottom. The only thing that moves is your hips and knees.

Once you've fixed all that then I cant really tell from this angle but make sure your knees dont go over your toes. It could just be a trick of the mind from the strange angle but it seems like your knees are going over.

The book is 12 bucks on kindle. Buy it if you dont have it.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA

video on hip drive eye gaze:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9B8s0yknGhA

u/switch24 · 2 pointsr/fitness30plus

I'd recommend the Starting Strength book

bookhttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B006XJR5ZA

It takes a bit of reading but is well worth it. Rippetoe has a few videos out there as well which are good (just ignore his arrogance if you can).

u/Sklanskers · 2 pointsr/progresspics

Thank's for the kind words man. The short answer is I've been following this book. A second book I recommend is Starting Strength which discusses in depth proper form for the key weightlifting workouts (bench press, standing military press, barbell squat, and deadlifts).

Bigger Leaner Stronger taught me everything from managing calories, what to eat, how to manage macros, good vs bad protein powder, supplements, vitamins, work out routines, etc. It is basically my gym bible. But, if you aren't interested in taking the time to read these books (which I HIGHLY recommend), then I'll give you a brief rundown of my workout routine.

Workouts "phases" are broken up into 9 weeks. A typical 9-week phase looks like this:

Weeks 1-3: Regular week lifting at 5 days per week (mon-fri)

Week 4: Strength Week. Only lift mon, wed, and fri, but focus on key workouts (Barbell squat, deadlift, bench press, military press)

Week 5-7: Same as week 1-3

Week 8: Strength week

Week 9: Deload or off week. I either don't work out this week or I do three days at 50% of my working weight (so essentially a light week)

A typical 5 day week looks likes this:

Monday: Chest and Abs. Incline bench press. Incline dumbell bench press. Flat barbell bench press. Face Pull. Three abdominal circuits where one circuit consists of Cable crunch (10 to 12 reps), captains chair leg raise to fail, bicycle crunch to fail

Tuesday: Back and Calves. Deadlift. Bent over barbell Rows. Pull ups. Standing calf raises. Seated calf raises.

Wednesday: Shoulder and Abs. Standing Military Press. Side lateral Raise. Bent over rear delt raise. 3 ab circuits.

Thursday: Legs. Barbell squat. Romanian deadlift. Leg press. Standing calf raise. Seated calf raise.

Friday: Upper body & Abs. Incline bench press. Barbell curl. Close-grip bench press. Alternating dumbell curl. Chest dips. 3 ab circuits.

A typical activity includes 4 warm up sets and three working sets like this:

12 x 50% of my working weight (rest 1 min);
10 x 50% of my working weight (rest 1 min);
4 x 70% of my working weight (rest 1 min);
1 x 90% of my working weight (rest 3 min)

After this warm up is complete, I do 3 working sets. 4-6 reps of my working weight (if i hit 6 reps, I add 10 lbs to a barbell or 5 lbs to a dumbell) Rest 3-4 min. Repeat this 2 more times. A huge key to building strength is progressive overload. If you hit those 6 reps, add more weight. If you hit 6 reps and add more weight but can only do 3 reps with the new weight, drop it back to where you were before. But next week, start with the higher weight.

As far as diet is concerned. Yes. This is the biggest thing. I eat clean. I eat very clean. I don't eat processed foods. I only drink milk and water. I eat vegetables and chicken. Good fats, good protein, and good carbs. I weigh everything I eat to make sure i'm hitting my calories and macros. I track everything in my fitness pal.

A typical meal day for me is protein bar before workout. Protein shake and banana after work out. 2 hardboiled eggs and 175 grams of plain nonfat greek yogurt for breakfast. 4 oz tuna and some triscuit crackers + a carrot for snack. Chicken breast and veges for lunch. Non-sorbate prunes and another banana for a late day snack. Protein shake for dinner. Maybe some more protein and veges.

TLDR

Read bigger leaner stronger. If you don't want to do that then the key items are eat clean and within your calorie limits (you can lose weight by eating in a caloric deficit without even needing to workout). The most important weightlifting exercises are barbell squats, deadlifts, standing military press, and bench press.

As my post title states, I only do cardio 0 to 1 times per week which is hardly anything. It's not necessary for fat loss, but it will help accelerate fat loss and increase cardiovascular health which is important and which is also why I'm going to start adding more cardio.

Best of luck man. That book changed my life. I highly recommend it.

u/Aruselide · 2 pointsr/asktransgender

It's hard both ways. At your height and weight, I would recommend bulking up for a year or two before trying to cut. Check out Mark Rippetoe's Starting Strenght program, works wonders.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA

u/Eccentrica_Gallumbit · 2 pointsr/Fitness

You can download the Kindle edition and read it directly on your computer.

u/McManiaC · 2 pointsr/Fitness

8,95€ on the german amazon.de. Definitely worth it. :)

u/lawmage · 2 pointsr/Fitness

For those in the US, it's $9.99. Definitely a good deal if you don't need a hard copy.

www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA

u/NSMike · 2 pointsr/AskGayMen

Motivation is overrated. Establish a habit. After work, or before, or whatever time where you can devote an hour or so to working out, make it a habit like brushing your teeth or shaving, or whatever. Make 6:00 am, or 5:00 pm, or whatever time of your day, the time you leave the house to go to the gym. Just have it programmed into your mind, "It is this time, and this time is when I work out."

And the other advice, of course, is to find something that isn't going to bore you to tears. Exercise bike will probably put you to sleep. Honestly the most interesting workouts I've done are lifting workouts. I did Stronglifts 5x5 for a couple years (there's a lot of writing on that site, but the most important info you need is just the routine). The way you gradually add weight, plus the variety of activities, and the endorphin hits you get from lifting make a huge difference. If you track, like I did, in a spreadsheet exactly what weight you'll be lifting on certain days, you can go back and look a few weeks ago, you were only squatting 125, now you're squatting 250 and it doesn't even seem that much harder... Seeing the numbers go up is extremely satisfying.

Also, Stronglifts is just a routine - it doesn't really coach you on how to do the lifts, so I would look up Mark Rippetoe on YouTube - he has videos detailing each lift in Stronglifts - and also pick up Starting Strength to see detailed explanations and diagrams of how some of these lifts are supposed to work. If you're not doing them right, not only are they going to do less for you, but you could hurt yourself.

u/elmay · 2 pointsr/xxfitness

You might want to check out r/powerlifting as well as the links on the sidebar here. Greg Nuckols who is popular over at r/powerlifting and also with my coach, has a beginner, intermediate, and advanced program you can download for free (you do need to give him your email address). Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe is also quite popular and has a beginner program in it. Finally, u/gczl has created a program that is very popular over on r/powerlifting.

One suggestion I would make is that you find a local powerlifting competition and attend it. It will give you an idea of the flow of a meet and maybe give you an opportunity to meet some local lifters and find out where they train.

u/pennerat · 2 pointsr/rugbyunion

On weight gain - this part is actually easier than you think. I've been a skinny dude for 26 good years, wondering why I could never gain weight despite years of consistent effort in the gym, then put on 45 good pounds last offseason. Get yourself on a good weight training program that focuses on basic compound lifts (squat, deadlift, bench press, overhead press), as well as a power movement (power clean or power snatch).

If you're willing to put in the time, read Starting Strength, which is the book that turned me around. 1000% would recommend. This book has the Starting Strength program, too, which has exactly the parameters I discussed above. Stronglifts 5x5 is pretty good too.

Most importantly, you need to eat a fuck load while you're doing this. Lots of protien (1g/pound of body weight). Keep track of this in a calorie counter (MyFitnessPal is good), and make sure you're gaining on average 1 pound per week (will be more at the start). Be consistent with your work and diet all through your offseason, and it will come.

On tackling - My first couple seasons, I played wing, and was terribly shitty at tackling. I spent a year in the pack, which almost got me there (now full time second row!). Once I put on the weight, my confidence in contact soared and I had no problems making tackles. I even played a game or two back on the wing and still made tackles out there, too. The key thing, I found, was mentally training myself to get low enough. As a tall fella, it's hard for me to get low in tackles... I always knew I needed to get low, but could never actually do it in games. I use a mental cue now to get low - it can really only get me to about hip/waist level, but I have enough leverage in my height that it's good enough for me. Deadlifting will help you a bit in recognizing this motor pattern.

Also, this video really helped me visualize the tackling technique within the context of a game (posted on this sub a few months ago). It's football, but the technique discussed is much more like rugby tackling, rather than typical unsafe gridion type of head charges.

The only disadvantage from it all is nobody can lift me in lineouts anymore :) I lift now, which is great for me, since I sucked at jumping anyway.

Good luck - Lift hard, eat big, and tackle strong. I've been in your almost-exact same situation.

Edit: Just wanted to reiterate a point I noticed in /u/GaryDo's post. Don't forget that size and strength are only a couple of tools inside of your rugby player bag. Important tools if used well, for sure, but there are many other skills that make a great player. You'll need fitness, contact technique, agility, game sense, and all that wonderful stuff. But in the mean time, don't be ashamed to concentrate on one goal.

u/leemobile · 2 pointsr/ottawa

I recently started going to the gym as a total newbie, and I found that using the Starting Strength program has given me really great results.

The book is only $10 on the kindle:
https://www.amazon.ca/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA

The beauty of Starting Strength is that all you need is a power rack for equipment. So any gym that has one will do, and the exercises only take about 45 minutes to go through, three times a week. The progress while on the program is pretty magical.

u/swingdancetraining · 2 pointsr/Fitness
u/carsinogen · 2 pointsr/Fitness

You can read online for $9.99. Seriously it is worth your time. 27 months ago I read the book and began seriously barbell training. I can now deadlift 500 lbs, bench over 300 lbs, OHP 235 lb, and squat 435 lbs at a bodyweight of 175 lb.

Read the book.

here is a link: http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1410299860&sr=8-1&keywords=starting+strength

u/nvanprooyen · 1 pointr/Fitness

Another recommendation for something like Stronglifts, Starting Strength etc. I personally just started Stronglifts after a long layoff that basically put me back in the "beginner" category. Like it a lot. Couple notes:


  1. FORM, FORM, FORM. Take the time to learn / perfect form. There's a lot of good resources out there. I would definitely recommend Mark Rippetoe's Starting Strength book that breaks down form on the major barbell lifts: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006XJR5ZA/

    If you look on YouTube there's some stuff in the Art of Manliness channel where Rippetoe gives good demonstrations on the squat, bench, dead etc: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=rippetoe+art+of+manliness


  2. Intensity. If you're just starting out, try and resist the urge to go too heavy. It's an ego thing for a lot of people. Start extremely light with everything, add weight incrementally and focus on #1.

    Here's a link to the SL site: http://stronglifts.com/5x5/
    (SL also has a GREAT mobile app for tracking workouts etc)

    edit>links
u/craklyn · 1 pointr/funny

This is a manual for beginning strength training that's very well respected. It tells you how to do the major gym lifts and why to do them. It's very well regarded for helping new people get into weight training.

Starting Strength

u/tanakasan1734 · 1 pointr/MTB

Yes, although I the biggest improvement in overall comfort, control and strength on the bike came from taking up weight lifting - mainly low bar back squats and dead lifts.

Pick up a copy of Starting Strength if you're interested.

u/killyouintheface · 1 pointr/steroids

Ah ha. Things become much clearer now.

The major compound lifts that should be the cornerstones of any strength program are the bench press, the standing (or military) press, the deadlift, and the back squat. They're called compound lifts because they work lots of different muscle groups at once.

If you've only been lifting for a month, I have some really great news for you. You're still a novice.

This means that, instead of using programs like you linked to, you can use a much simpler program that has you increasing the weight every single time you touch a barbell. Programs like Stronglifts 5x5 and Starting Strength (my personal favorite) are intended for people such as yourself.

Also, since you're still a novice, I can't in good conscience recommend you start using AAS now. In part because with a program that uses linear weight increases, you're going to start getting a lot stronger awfully fast anyway, and also because your tendons and ligaments will take a real beating if you let AAS help your muscles outrun the development of the rest of your connective tissues.

u/silverblaze92 · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

This book has some very good info for those starting out.

The biggest thing is to start slow, but never miss a day. Even if you run one day, yoga the next, whatever it may be. You MUST do it everyday no matter what to force the habit.

u/racontemoi · 1 pointr/TheRedPill
u/sloppychris · 1 pointr/Fitness

Oh! Just realized you didn't reference Starting Strength in your question! That's the book I was referring to, it gets recommended a lot around here. Here's an Amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1380765298&sr=8-1&keywords=starting+strength

u/Steven_the_Horse · 1 pointr/Fitness

I'm seeing recommendations to look at YouTube for advice, which is a good idea, but there are a lot of fitness YouTubers who don't have a fucking clue what they're talking about, so just make sure you find a reputable source.

A few channels I really like:

  • Alan Thrall
  • Starting Strength
  • OmarIsuf
  • BroScienceLife

    Totally joking about the last one. Do not take any serious advice from Dom Mazetti. It's good for a few laughs though, and the other three are legit.

    Other than that, I highly recommend buying the Starting Strength book by Mark Rippetoe. I'm completely convinced it's the single best resource available for any gym noob who wants to get into lifting.
u/HAESbro · 1 pointr/Fitness

Starting Strength for the kindle is only 9.99. There is a kindle reader for PC.

You could very well start with 5/3/1 , but you will miss out on a lot of super fast linear progression from SS. I'd say do SS and add dips + chinups or pullups first.

u/thealfreds · 1 pointr/Fitness
u/NHLmachine · 1 pointr/Fitness

No problem, takes no time at all. In all of those programs and books I mentioned they will tell you exactly what weight to lift and when. There are a handful of programs that pretty much the entire weightlifting community agrees are the best of all time, so your goal should be to use one of those programs as soon as you are able. My favorite of those and the one I would recommend you do is Jim Wendler's 5/3/1. He has a book that goes with it and teaches you everything you need to know to use that program and have a training plan for the next 1-5 years.

The problem is, 5/3/1 works by far the best once you've gotten the basics down and have some weightlifting experience. Things are different when you're first starting out. You're focused on technique, learning the different lifts, timing your sets and reps, etc. You start out lifting little to no weight, but as a beginner you will progress much more quickly than usual. For that reason you should read a good book like starting strength, and then do a beginner program for at least a few months. Once you get that quality experience you can move on to the 5/3/1 and know for a fact you're taking the most proven and intelligent approach you can. It's very relaxing knowing you're doing the right thing instead of worrying about it and jumping from program to program. Get yourself a bench so you can do all 3 of the big 3! Get creative and somehow find a way, don't take no for an answer. You absolutely must find a way to bench press, it's hugely important for growing your upper body (and it's the most important lift for feeling like a manly man).

Here's the stronglift 5x5 book, it's free: http://stronglifts.com/5x5/

Read that and it should answer all your questions.

u/czerrr · 1 pointr/stronglifts

Grip on all the movements or specific ones?

Dead lifts are tricky because of the different sized weights.

The BEST book to answer all your questions thoroughly that I have encountered is going to be starting strength by mark rippletoe. It's like 8 bucks on amazon I highly recommend it.

I use to have knee problems with my squat and elbow problems with my bench, but after I read that those pains went away and I was also able to teach people how to perform movements better.

So again, buy the book and read it lol. It's not a breeze to read either. It's more like a freaking textbook but hey, it works.

Here is the link to amazon.

It will answer all your questions and will make you smarter about lifting than just about 90 percent of the population my good sire.

If you still need additional help, or you don't want to read the book, lmk and maybe you can record your lifts so I can critique your form.

Good day

u/ThymeReddit · 1 pointr/loseit

https://www.reddit.com/r/Fitness/wiki/faq#wiki_exercise_details

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006XJR5ZA/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?ie=UTF8&btkr=1

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRLOLGZl3-QTaJfLmAKgoAw

Beginner Routine -Starting Strength, Ice Cream Fitness, Grayskulls LP, Strong Lifts are all (basically) the same. Pick one and do it for 6 months. Starting Strength takes the least amount of time with Ice Cream Fitness the most. They're all 3 times a week 1-1:30s total.

If you're a reader the book Starting Strength is invaluable for understanding the 4 main lifts as well as some importance of strength training in general to every sport. So even if you decide to do ICF or SLs i'd purchase the book for squat, deadlift, bench and Over Head Press form advice and pictures.

Allen Thrall has great form videos on squats, deadlifts, bench, rows and OHP.

You'll get stronger with more lean mass and less fat from weight lifting. Good Luck!!!

u/Shiner_Black · 1 pointr/CCW

If you want to learn how to deadlift correctly, get this book, Starting Strength. There's no need to work on your "core" before starting, you just have to start light enough and get the form down.

u/pmward · 1 pointr/Fitness

Sadly, I haven't yet found an app worthy of replacing a good old notebook for tracking purposes. As for something you can have on you to help you with the proper form download the ebook of Starting Strength. That's pretty much the gold standard when it comes to form. Nothing else even comes close.

https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1486993373&sr=8-1

u/eddododo · 1 pointr/lifting

Buy Starting Strength By Mark Rippetoe

The ebook is like $10.
This is the best decision you can make, especially since you're lucky enough to be young.

After you exhaust it, get ''Practical Programming,'' also by Rippetoe.


What is your height/weight?

u/brunosalcedo · 1 pointr/cycling

I strongly recommend the Starting Strength book and program.

The book is going to explain a lot of what you really need to know: proper form.

The program is simple enough that you can easily follow it. You have three main (fantastic) composite lifts: barbell squat, barbell row, and bench press. You will do four sets of up to 10 exercises. You will increase your weight weekly. You can complement with other isolation exercises depending on what you want to emphasize.

​

If you don't want to buy the book just remember. PROPER FORM IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF LIFTING. And full range of motion is important to. If you do half reps with heavy weight and poor form. You will injure yourself and you will reduce your gain potential. If you don't want to buy the book, go to youtube or bodybuilder.com and watch videos that explain the proper form of any exercise that you plan to make.

u/Manetheren86 · 1 pointr/keto

I essentially am following Rippletoe's proposed workouts. You can either buy the book or just search google and probably get some workout routine proposals. It's based on barbell training...mainly squats/deadlifts/chest press.

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Mark-Rippetoe-ebook/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1409773824&sr=1-1&keywords=starting+strength

u/giantjerk · 1 pointr/BariatricSurgery

I had the sleeve a couple years ago. I started lifting 3 to 4 days a week regularly. I try to get at least 100g of protein if not more a day. I haven't really been able to bulk up but I have definitely gotten much stronger and have built some muscle. My weight loss stopped when I started lifting though but it hasn't gone up... just stopped. I guess I am replacing fat with muscle? All I know is I am feeling better either way.

Edit: I am using the Starting Strength beginner program btw in case you are wondering. I highly recommend picking up the book on Amazon. Starting Strength https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_yD9rDbMPZBWCJ

u/trpobserver · 1 pointr/PurplePillDebate

>I wanted to see if there was anything I could do to help.

Other than fucking him yourself:

Buy him this book

Link him to this page

Boom, you may have saved a life!

u/bromanji · 1 pointr/bodyweightfitness

Take a look at the chapter on overhead press in starting strength. Correct form is discussed, along with diagrams of how the shoulder moves during the movement.

u/NorthShoreITguy · 0 pointsr/Fitness

Check out strong lift 5x5 workout. Basic lifts. There's an app to track your progress. Once you understand what you're doing and establish a baseline with your strength you can change your routine to focus on muscle groups.

Read about pros and cons of Stronglifts here:https://www.bodybuilding.com/content/is-stronglifts-5x5-the-right-training-program-for-you.html

Guides for proper form here:
https://stronglifts.com/blog/

Good reading for strength and nutrition:
Starting Strength https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006XJR5ZA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_yNEWBb9R5GAH9

u/rickrossroll · 0 pointsr/weightroom