Reddit Reddit reviews TETON Sports Scout 3400 Internal Frame Backpack; High-Performance Backpack for Backpacking, Hiking, Camping; Hunter Green (121)

We found 25 Reddit comments about TETON Sports Scout 3400 Internal Frame Backpack; High-Performance Backpack for Backpacking, Hiking, Camping; Hunter Green (121). Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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TETON Sports Scout 3400 Internal Frame Backpack; High-Performance Backpack for Backpacking, Hiking, Camping; Hunter Green (121)
VERSATILE QUICK TRIP PACK: Just right for youth and adults for light backpacking trips; best for 2-4-day adventures; 3400 cubic inches (55 L) capacity; weighs 4.5 pounds (2 kg)COMFORT YOU CAN CUSTOMIZE: Multi-position torso adjustment fits wide range of body sizes; Durable open-cell foam lumbar pad and molded channels provide maximum comfort and airflowTRUSTED QUALITY: Hiking backpack with hundreds of verified 5-star reviews testifying to the quality and design; sleeping bag compartment, compression straps, and exterior pockets for strategic packingTETON SPORTS PROMISE: Reach out to our AMAZING product support team if you have any questions or concerns; YOU CAN COUNT ON US to get you taken care of and back OUTDOORS with TETON SportsNOT YOUR BASIC BACKPACK: Continues to be the top selling internal frame backpack on Amazon at a great price for all the included features; Backpack for men and women. Waist Belt- Adjustable 26 - 60 inches. Torso Length- Adjustable 15 - 19.5 inch
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25 Reddit comments about TETON Sports Scout 3400 Internal Frame Backpack; High-Performance Backpack for Backpacking, Hiking, Camping; Hunter Green (121):

u/SacredUrchin · 11 pointsr/CampingGear

I haven't used that backpack you're looking at but I can tell from its design, that it doesn't look like it'll carry the weight comfortably if you're planning on a 3 day backpacking trip in wilderness. This pack is probably better for normal travel so if you're car camping and have access to amenities then this pack should do fine. It also doesn't look big enough to carry a tent, sleeping bag, food, water, etc.

Assuming you'll be deeper in wilderness and using a tent, sleeping bag, pad, etc., I would recommend something that will carry comfortably (aim weight toward your hips and reduce weight on your back) and there are better options out there. You'd want a backpacking backpack at least and you can probably find lots of options within (or close to) your budget.
Below are a few suggestions within a few different price ranges (not sure how strict your budget is).
Side note: I used to own the previous version of the Teton - it was my first backpack - for the price it did a pretty good job and never had any major complaints:

TETON Sports Scout 3400 60L

Mountaintop 55L Backpacking Pack

Mountaintop 65L Internal Frame Backpack Hiking Backpack with Rain Cover

50L Hiking Backpack EocuSun Waterproof Camping Backpack Outdoor Sport Lightweight Backpacking Bag

Hope this helps - have fun on your trip!

u/pointblankjustice · 7 pointsr/bugout

I mean no disrespect, but I also tend to be rather blunt: There is a lot of work that needs to be done to this bag. It seems really thrown together, out of an amalgamation of random stuff that's vaguely "outdoorsy".

Firstly, the bag itself. There's probably a reason it was in the trash, and my suspicion is that it wasn't because it was well built, durable, and comfortable. Good bags can be had for not much money and there are definitely used options on Craigslist and at outdoor store garage sales if you're on a shoestring budget. Your bag has to be able to take the abuse of multiple days and many miles of rucking.

FOUR knives? And they are all folders to boot? And you're trying to tell me this isn't "bloated"? Come on. Get one good multitool like a Leatherman, or keep the Gerber if you must (you don't need 87 bits for your Gerber in the woods, either). Maaaybe carry a fixed blade, too, if you really think you'll be needing it.

Mess kit: That looks bulky as hell, and aluminum has an incredibly low melting point (something like ~1200F) which is easily attainable in a mature fire. Hello melted mess kit. If you are really just bugging out you shouldn't need to cook anything. Calorie dense food bars, jerky, nuts etc. should be sufficient. Get a super small mess kit like this amazing one from GSI Outdoor and use this very cheap but decent backpacking stove and you have a lightweight, highly functional way to cook, boil water, and drink for under $25.

Blade sharpener? If you somehow manage to dull all four of your knives in a few days you're doing something wrong. Save the blade sharpener for the Zombies-Are-Attacking INCH bag or whatever.

Sunscreen and bug repellent are both great. that said, you are carrying almost as much sunscreen as you are water. Embellishing, of course, but that's a fucking lot of sunscreen.

I would also seriously work on flushing out that medical kit. If you don't have much first aid training, that's fine (though you should get some) but a basic boo-boo kit will be really functional. Gauze, small band-aids, some medium sized non-stick pads, alcohol wipes, burn cream and/or antibiotic cream, tweezers, rubber gloves, pain relievers, anti-diarrheals, generic antihistamines (for regular allergies and allergic reactions), etc. etc. Avoid pre-built medical kits and avoid things you don't know how to use.

The MSR filter is actually fantastic, can't fault you there. That said, something like a Sawyer Mini would be a fair bit lighter, and has integral water storage should you need more.

Metal water bottle: Looks like a thermos, which is great for keeping your coffee warm on the way to work but is single-use and heavy in the backwoods. I'd suggest changing it out for a widemouth single-walled metal container like those from Klean Kanteen because now not only do you have a way to store water, but you also have a way to boil it! And you can cook in it if absolutely necessary. And you can fill it up with hot water and add it to your sleeping bag to stay warm.

Wait...where is your sleeping bag? I know you mentioned having some miscellaneous camping gear in your car, but what if you need to abandon your car? Look at even a simple bivy sack like this one from SOL. Coupled with a lightweight tarp and you have a functional survival sleep system. Throw in a small inflatable pad for insulation from the ground and you can survive in all but the most inclement of weather.

Lose the rat traps and 200(!!!) fishing hooks in exchange for calorie dense food bars and other foods that need little or no preparation. Try to stay above 130 calories/gram and pay attention to things that are high in protein, fiber, and fat. You're bugging out, remember? Not sitting around camp all day with a cold one and your rod in the lake.

Substitute your few cheap (read: heavy and unreliable) flashlights for one good one. Something like a Four Sevens Quark AA2 or something from Fenix, Nitecore, or Olight. It will be reliable, well built, and powered by an efficient driver to produce multiple modes of light and provide for good run time. Get something that takes standard AA or AAA batteries. Avoid CR123As.

Noticeably lacking are things like a map and firestarters. You mentioned a ferrocerium rod. Instead of spending $7.00 on a decent one of those, get three BIC lighters and a pack of waterproof matches in a container. And save a couple bucks in the process. Ever started a fire with a ferro rod? It sucks. I've done it. I do it for fun and honing my skills occasionally. But a simple ass BIC will work 100 times better in almost any situation.

Add a high quality, water resistant topographical map of your region. Do you know how to use that compass? I'm not talking about pointing it north, but for things like triangulation or magnetic declination or navigating to a point on your map by finding a bearing. There are tons of Youtube videos out there that will help you in understanding these techniques if you don't already. A compass by itself is near useless.

How about things that you're more likely to encounter?

Throw in a charger for your phone, or maybe one of those $5 burner flip phones and a $10 minutes card in case yours dies. Take the battery out (should be removable on a cheap pay-as-you-go bog standard phone) and write important numbers on the inside.

How about wiping your ass? Go to your nearest Walmart and hit the toiletries section. You'll find bins of $1.00 miniature travel accessories. I'd recommend a toothbrush, toothpaste, deodorant bar, personal wet wipes (preferably biodegradable), Chapstick, and some baby powder or Gold Bond. Throw it all in a gallon Ziplock or a small pouch. Now you can survive in the woods AND survive overnight a friend's house after you get too drunk and can't drive.

I see nothing for cold weather gear. I know it's summer but depending on where you are night time can still be cold as hell. Add a beanie, wool gloves, a fleece underlayer, a poncho or rainproof hard shell jacket, and a change of GOOD wool socks.


Lose the 9 million feet of paracord. 50ft should be plenty sufficient (if that) especially considering the inner strands are strong enough for most applications.

I think that covers all my major gripes. Back to drinking and being an ass.

u/lolliegagger · 6 pointsr/CampingGear

Mountaintop 40 liter pretty good for 40 bucks, however I'm upgrading again soon. This one is great and I've had it for about two years now with no sign of wear and tear but I wish I had gone with a 50 or 60 liter bag as the 40 really strains for space on a week long trip. Its perfect for about three days however and that's usually what I do anyway. here's some pics of mine the thing I was most concerned about was support and this does a decent enough job, I'd say 7/10. It has molded foam support which is good but a external frame style seems better to me ( however that's a opinionated subject ) id reccamend going ahead and getting either this one or a larger Teton, or the larger version of mine if your planning on staying out for more than 5 days or so. Less than that and I'd highly recommend mine :)

u/quarl0w · 6 pointsr/CampingGear

Teton Sports has a range of sleeping bags that would fit your needs.

  • Altos is a down mummy bag rated for 0°F for $170
  • Leef is synthetic mummy bag rated for 0°F for $75, or 20°F for $75
  • Tracker synthetic mummy bag rated for 5°F for $67
  • They even make double bags if you aren't travelling alone.

    I have a Polara rectangular bag (I like the extra space for me feet) that has a fleece liner that I took on a scout camp that kept me warm down to 15°F. We picked up an Evergreen bag for less than $50 on Black Friday.

    I like Teton sports because they have a lifetime warranty on their stuff, and they are a local company based out of Utah. They also make decent backpacks and pillows.
u/cwcoleman · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Neither of those would be very good for hiking/camping.
At 34/40 liters they will most definitely be too small to hold your full overnight backpacking kit, including food and clothing.

Military / bugout bags like this are not really practical for wilderness adventures. You would be much better off getting a bag designed for backpacking, with a real hip belt.

$70 is a low budget for a quality bag in the 50-65 liter range (what you likely need).
Is buying used or renting an option?

----
Teton is a popular 'cheap' brand. Their packs are in your price range, although they aren't exactly the most comfortable or quality.

u/Demilente · 2 pointsr/AskPhotography

Search for a hiking backpack with an internal frame. Better for your back. Get an insert that fits and your set. Test one at your local sporting goods store to get a feel for frames and sizes.

TETON Sports Scout 3400 Internal Frame Backpack; High-Performance Backpack for Backpacking, Hiking, Camping; Hunter Green https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_i_vToYCb72YRVYY

u/thebayouborn · 2 pointsr/CasualConversation

I've been eying this guy on amazon, which states it's sufficient for 2-4 day excursions, which would be plenty for what I intend to do for now. The camping area I plan on backpacking to is mostly a swampland/basin area with plenty of opportunities for fishing and trapping.

u/CJOttawa · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

My friend has the Teton 4000 65L pack.

Material is most certainly a cut above the thin stuff you'd expect on a Walmart pack but not quite the same level as mainstream packs like Osprey, Gregory etc. Don't abuse it and you'll be fine.

They make a 55L, the 3400 series, as well.

Double to triple the budget of the Teton packs and you're into the Osprey Volt (60L or 75L) or the Atmos (50 or 65L).

u/macetheface · 2 pointsr/bugout

something like this?

u/falcorethedog · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Could someone help me compare this pack and this one. I'm looking for an entry pack that I can take on a 2-3 (at most) trip.

u/Raypoint · 1 pointr/vagabond

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000F34ZKS?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

This one, I have to leave by saturday so I ordered it and hope it'll hold up for atleast a few months.

u/CodySpring · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Since I'm new at this (I have however been camping in wilderness multiple times for 3-5 days, just never backpacking) I've been reading a ton of guides. I don't have a huge budget since this is something I'm just getting into, but looking around at different reviews this seems to be the best stuff I can get within my price range. If anyone cares to take a look and possibly give any suggestions I would appreciate it.

  • Tent - I wanted a two person because the weight difference between this and similar-priced one person tents didn't seem large enough, and more importantly I plan on backpacking with SO or my sister, so the split weight from only having one person carrying a tent seems better.


  • Backpack - Once again, budget, but seems to be exactly what I need.


  • Sleeping Bag - I'm in Louisiana, so nearby backpacking spots such as Texas don't warrant me buying a super low F rated sleeping bag. I don't want to be burning up and I figure once I get to the point where I'm hiking in colder weather I won't mind dropping more cash on a better rated sleeping bag.
u/mschwar99 · 1 pointr/hiking

I don't have any experience with LL Bean gear, but I don't see anything wrong with the those items.

When I started I intentionally bought cheap gear knowing it wasn't going to be as light or as durable as a backpacker would ideally want. I figured I might as well try some basics out before I committed to spending money on high quality gear.

The pack you list looks pretty small - only 2400-ish cubic inches. That could be a tight fit. I started out with this guy. Its an ok but certainly not "good" pack. Its not super durable or super comfortable, but it was inexpensive and it got me through my first 3 trips until I decided I liked backpacking. After that third trip I went to an REI and got help trying on lots of different packs before laying down a good chunk of cash on my Gregory.

I still use this tent. Although a couple pounds heavier than the one you list its worked out well for me and its less than half the price.

You'll also need some other gear to do overnights. REI has a good list here. Highlights include hydration (something to carry water and a water filter / pump / tablets / whatever), food storage, headlamp / lighting, etc.

Do you live anywhere near an REI? Along with having great staff to chat with about what might want to buy they occasionally have "garage sales" where they have returned / used items at crazy discounts.

u/cdann58 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

I would give it a 6/10 rating for a pack.. but for the price i would give it 8/10.. I was using this one

http://www.amazon.com/Teton-Sports-Internal-Backpack-Hunter/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1367986527&sr=8-2&keywords=teton

Its hard to keep the weight overall even and the metal rods in the frame didn't really feel long enough.. On top of that my back got really hot wearing it.. but I hiked uphill and downhill with it for about 4 miles through snow, dirt, and ice during a 3 day winter trip in Angeles National Forrest in California.. I wouldn't recommend it for anything longer than a weekend.. just not built well enough.. but still works. As you can see I have a love hate relationship.. but thats probably because it was my first pack ever.

Overall its great for the price.. but at the same time you get what you pay for..

u/WitOfTheIrish · 1 pointr/BuyItForLife

The Teton line has served me very well. I also use it as my general suitcase, since it passes all the carry-on requirements. The rain-fly is a very nice feature, and the adjustable lumbar support and waist belt are really nice for tall guys like us (though I'm only 6'2").

Of course, I'm only going on 2+ years of (relatively) heavy use, some camping, some backpacking through Europe, and multiple trips to visit family back in Ohio.

u/touchmystuffIkillyou · 1 pointr/preppers

"Best" is really subjective.

For those on a budget or need to build multiple bags, here's some great, cheap packs. Suitable for most backpacking (maybe not hardcore extended adventuring/mountaineering). Great value for the money.

Small

Medium

More sizes available. Search Teton Backpacks on amazon.

u/dead_pirate_robertz · 1 pointr/BoyScouts

Link to a good backpack on Amazon, please?

How about this one?

My son is about 4'8" and 68 pounds (super-skinny).

u/sim_pl · 1 pointr/travel

48L is pretty small if you are going to be doing any sort of camping etc. I'd recommend at least looking at a 60-65. Anyways, that's not what you are asking.

As far as cheap but sturdy, I bought both the Teton Fox for myself and the Teton Sports Explorer for my girlfriend and found them to be both fairly reliable. This was for an 8 week backpacking trip where I stayed in hostels through Europe (my gf was there for 5 of the weeks), so it didn't go through the rigor of camping, through I'd be willing to say that they would be entirely adequate.

For you, I would say that maybe the Scout or the Summit could be good matches.

Another advantage of going this cheap is that even if the backpack ends up breaking (again, not likely on the first trip), you'll be in a better position to understand what you do and don't like about it.

Oh and don't forget a raincover if they aren't built in.

TL;DR: Teton makes good cheap backpacks but I don't have experience with the smaller sizes. Also think about a slightly larger backpack.

Edit: Forgot to mention that I bought mine without trying it on first and it was close to the perfect size (could have used slightly longer straps over the shoulder, I'm 6'1"), but I have some decent experience with backpacks. For the most part, if you read enough of the reviews you'll find people of certain sizes fitting/not fitting.

Edit dos: Even more thoughts. It's free to try on backpacks in stores, and worth your time just to get accustomed to what the various sizes actually feel like and what sort of features you like. Once you try a few you'll get the hang of it.

u/Trailman80 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

You really need to go and try some packs out or better yet Buy a few and load it with what you think you will be carrying do not have the store people stuff bags in there it's not the same as having gear in there they fell much more different. I ended up with a Osprey Black and a Green Pack. I also have a Kelty Lakota 65 for longer hikes.

Osprey is the lighter of the Brands Gregory and Kelty are more heavier and more durable, but if you take care of the packs even the ultra light ones will last you. For $150 you won't be getting the Higher end packs they cost more then that, Or you can try a REI Garage sale and get lucky.

Trips like the one's you posted are great for light packs like the Osprey 65 you can pack a bunch in that pack and still feel like nothing is on your back. The only thing I don't like about Osprey is the side zippers I am a larger man and they don't work too well with my form lol.

This TETON Sports is a great pack it's not the lightest but for the money and the ENTIRE pack is nylon so it's tough as nails, I used it for a few year before upgrading to a lighter packs. I do not regret this at all.

here is a new version

https://www.amazon.com/Sports-Adventurer-Ultralight-Backpacking-Mountaineering/dp/B016ZXEDCQ/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_sims?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Sports-Internal-ALUMINUM-Backpack-Backpacking/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=sr_1_5?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1500753362&sr=1-5&keywords=hiking%2Bbackpack&th=1

u/Kid-The-Billy · 1 pointr/camping

I have an Teton outdoors scout 3400. It's a 54L bag that is really comfortable and has some good features and is pretty affordable the msrp is about 140, but you can find it on amazo ng for about 80. It a good quality bag at a pretty good price and it comes I a couple different colors. It also has a great warranty that protects against defects for the entire lifetime of the bag.


TETON Sports Scout 3400 Internal Frame https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_qNgyCbX0KY5RM

u/devingboggs · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

I use this

G-raphy Camera Insert Bag with Sleeve Camera Case (Orange)

and put in in the bottom most part of whichever hiking bag I'm using. For my larger pack (65L) (https://www.amazon.com/Teton-Sports-Internal-High-Performance-Backpacking/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=sr_1_2?crid=3QLFXUFBOG8OX&keywords=teton+backpack+65l&qid=1550902518&s=gateway&sprefix=65l+teto%2Caps%2C151&sr=8-2).

I put it in the sleeping bag compartment like arcana73. Then use the outside loops of the sleeping compartment usually used for tents for the tripod. Want to keep that weight low for stability and to maximize comfort. That insert bag holds my canon 6d body, my 70-300mm, my 50mm pancake, and my 14mm rokinon wide lens. I use a seperate bag I got for my iOptron skytracker to hold filters, remote shutter, additional sds, and so on. For my tent and sleeping bag I simply just put those in the main compartment, opting usually for a light hammock set-up when the weather's good.

​

Overall I think a larger backpacking pack will do wonders for the duality you want, leaving room for food and supplies you'll need for those few days. Just be sure to get a nice insert to organize your gear and make sure you get a bag that allows it to be readily accessible like with a sleeping bag compartment, it will save you alot of headache of not having to take out all your stuff to get to your camera!

​

PS When looking into his I'd recommend also getting some external mounting system for your camera onto your packso you can minimize stopping time for fool around in the bag to put the camera in and out. Something like the Peak Design's clip (https://www.googleadservices.com/pagead/aclk?sa=L&ai=DChcSEwjig_Pfm9HgAhUVjcgKHef7BOMYABAIGgJxdQ&ohost=www.google.com&cid=CAESEeD2tnd3YimtpuoDUrupzsjx&sig=AOD64_1VNtF2qgoCRHRekkWs4nNs0xkT6Q&ctype=5&q=&ved=0ahUKEwj21Ozfm9HgAhWtm-AKHQoIC58Q9aACCDc&adurl=https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1086507-REG/peak_design_cp_2_capture_pro_camera_clip.html/?ap=y&gclid=Cj0KCQiA2L7jBRCBARIsAPeAsaMvphVGvlxGsKqAxoQjry9wyVVOGvLmxwoq7sOaB7o-6ePuao0kMUUaAmGkEALw_wcB&lsft=BI%3A514&smp=Y) helps a lot with this subtle annoyance.

u/marcusabq56 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

I had some female friends who bought these:
http://www.amazon.com/Teton-Sports-Internal-Backpack-Hunter/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1395182081&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking

No problems, the pack worked great from both of them. We went on a 3 night trip. I don't think the boob issue should keep you away from this pack either. Both were fine.

u/ferox1 · 0 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Cheap Backpack Suggestions?

Looking to get a lighter pack, but not looking to spend a lot at the moment, as I will probably get a better pack later once I know my needs better.. I have a two night backpacking trip in about a week in Red River Gorge. I'll be using my hammock. I have found these four:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LPJUNYW/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_4?smid=A14Q688O8PFMTG&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01DZK65W8/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_5?smid=A38N1X0G3NLPB&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07C7V8Y38/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_6?smid=A14Q688O8PFMTG&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000F34ZKS/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_7?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

Thoughts? Better suggestions? Prefer Amazon due to quick shipping.