Reddit Reddit reviews The Elements of Scoring: A Master's Guide to the Art of Scoring Your Best When You're Not Playing Your Best

We found 10 Reddit comments about The Elements of Scoring: A Master's Guide to the Art of Scoring Your Best When You're Not Playing Your Best. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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The Elements of Scoring: A Master's Guide to the Art of Scoring Your Best When You're Not Playing Your Best
ISBN13: 9780684864020Condition: NewNotes: BRAND NEW FROM PUBLISHER! 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Tracking provided on most orders. Buy with Confidence! Millions of books sold!
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10 Reddit comments about The Elements of Scoring: A Master's Guide to the Art of Scoring Your Best When You're Not Playing Your Best:

u/tizod · 4 pointsr/golf

Congratulations - it sounds like you are well on your way to the path that I am just beginning to embark on.

I used to play golf several times a week and practiced at the range a ton but was always stuck at an average of 91. Then I took 6 years off from playing and just returned this year to be right back where I was...averaging 91.

In those 6 years I obviously did not get better - I just got older. So it made me realize recently that I need to re-think how I do things if I am every going to get to an average in the 80s.

I am right now reading "How to Break 90" and just ordered "The Elements of Scoring" this morning.

Already I have identified one of my biggest issues after just reading a few pages of "How to Break 90"

DON'T FOLLOW A BAD SHOT WITH ANOTHER BAD SHOT

I cannot tell you how many times I have had a poor drive that has put me off the fairway only to follow it up with a piss poor attempt to "make the green" in heroic fashion which, without fail, never happens.

I cannot report yet on if any of this has helped since I haven't played yet but I have a round scheduled for Friday and here is my game plan.

  1. No matter how long the hole is, if the fairway is narrow or there is trouble to my right, use my 3 wood.

  2. Do not swing "hard" - go for the easy swing which I have no problem doing on the range which 99.9% of the time goes straight.

  3. Do not focus on making the green in regulation. Instead, plan for my second shot (on a par 4) to leave me with an easier chip onto the green (which coincides with my new found practice approach focusing most of my time on my short game).

  4. Don't try and be a hero or go for the low percentage shot. If I am 150 yards from my target, don't go with a strong 6 or a shot that needs to be perfect in order to execute. Instead, swallow my pride and hit an easier 5.

  5. Set my personal goal to be to make no more then bogey on any hole. This is the first concept that is explained in "How to Break 90" Set your own "personal par" of one over for each hole or give yourself an extra shot per hole. I am usually good for at least a couple of pars per round so use this method to eliminate the doubles or triples that usually appear.

    Hopefully this will help. We shall see.
u/i_miss_old_reddit · 2 pointsr/golf

Sounds like you need to do some reading. You practice the physical part of your game, but do you practice the mental part?

Golf is not a game of perfect.
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Elements of Scoring
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u/TehMe · 2 pointsr/golf

As others have said, pre-shot routine goes a long way to keeping you in the moment and feeling natural and relaxed as you take your swing.

Also, everyone's performance varies from day to day. I love the book The Elements of Scoring: A Master's Guide to the Art of Scoring Your Best When You're Not Playing Your Best by Raymond Floyd. He talks about how there are the times when everything feels right and your swing is just locked in, but most of the time you're just not going to feel like that. He says most of his big wins came when he felt he wasn't playing his best, but by playing smart - around the things that weren't working and to the things that were - he was able finish on top. I've read it multiple times and always pick up something new. Good luck!

u/Muddlesthrough · 2 pointsr/golf

Grounds for Golf by Geoff Shackelford is a concise history of golf course architecture. Its and entertaining read and will make you fall in love with strategic/minimalist courses.

American Triumverate is a nice biography of Snead, Hogan and Nelson and how they brought about the "modern era" of golf.

The Elements of Scoring by Raymond Floyd is the best book on attitude and course management I've ever read. Highly entertaining. It'll give you a whole new perspective on how to play.

u/PhaliasMaximus · 1 pointr/golf

This isn't what you asked for, but this book helped me a lot when I was right around the same skill level you are now. And you can pick up a used copy for cheap. It's a short book, all about course management and strategy: https://www.amazon.com/Elements-Scoring-Masters-Guide-Playing/dp/0684864029

u/[deleted] · 1 pointr/golf
u/oxy_tosin · 1 pointr/golf

Check out Ray Floyd's The Elements of Scoring. Short, straightforward read from one of the game's all-time greats.