Reddit Reddit reviews The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, Completely Revised and Updated with Over 400 New Color Photos and Illustrations

We found 3 Reddit comments about The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, Completely Revised and Updated with Over 400 New Color Photos and Illustrations. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, Completely Revised and Updated with Over 400 New Color Photos and Illustrations
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3 Reddit comments about The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, Completely Revised and Updated with Over 400 New Color Photos and Illustrations:

u/stm78 · 3 pointsr/flyfishing

Welcome to a lifelong addiction! I agree with a lot of people on here that buying a good book will help you out a lot. Likewise, spending some time casting before you hit the water will make for a lot less frustration. A good book will help you know how to cast right and what it feels like. I don't own it myself, but I've heard good things personally about this book:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/1592288189

Now as to your equipment, whatever works best for you is what you should fish with, regardless of how cheap it is. That being said, there is a big difference between a professionally designed rod and a generic fly rod. If you can possibly afford to step it up a bit in your price range, you will set yourself up with equipment that will easily keep you both happy and challenged for 5-10 years. Here's my recommendation (just a recommendation, nothing more, nothing less):

Temple Fork Outfitters make professionally designed rods that, like most major brands, have a lifetime guarantee and you can always return it (or a piece of it) for a repair. They are able to offer a seriously nice rod for less because the manufacturing is done in China. The company and design is in the US. Basically, it's a great rod for a lot less because of where it's made. http://www.templeforkflyrods.com/

Ross reels are like the GMC of fly reels. Nothing fancy, but super dependable and you get everything you need to do the job. My first reel was a Ross (anyone remember the Cimarron?) and I keep it around because it's every bit as usable as when I bought it 12 years ago. They're seriously good reels.
http://www.rossreels.com/

As to the length, I strongly suggest something near a 9'. It gives you enough flex to "feel" a backcast so that you can establish a good cast early on. This way, you won't have to break bad habits later in your life. The standard weight for a beginner is 5. However, don't feel intimidated by a 3 or 4. If you're fishing for trout, these are all acceptable.

This was a bit longer than I expected, but I hope it is useful. PM if you have any questions that I can help with.

EDIT: Sorry, one last thing!

The less fished the water, the more likely you are to be successful on it. Spend a bit of time looking around your area on google maps or topos and find water that may be smaller, but is further from a road. Any time water is visible from a road, you can almost guarantee it has been fished earlier in the day before you. Finding somewhere remote will give you some positive feedback on fishing and keep you from getting frustrated early on.

Ok, I'll shut up now.

u/abpho · 2 pointsr/flyfishing

I think the best instructional books for a beginner are either the Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide or the LL Bean Ultimate Book of Fly-Fishing. For fun reads, you can't go wrong with any of John Gierach's books. Trout Bum would be a good starting point.

u/aksid · 2 pointsr/Fishing

this is an excellent book to read when you are trying to get into flyfishing http://www.amazon.com/Fly-Fishing-Completely-Revised-Updated-Illustrations/dp/1592288189