Reddit Reddit reviews TP-Link N150 Wireless 3G/4G Portable Router with Access Point/WISP/Router Modes (TL-MR3020)

We found 18 Reddit comments about TP-Link N150 Wireless 3G/4G Portable Router with Access Point/WISP/Router Modes (TL-MR3020). Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Electronics
TP-Link N150 Wireless 3G/4G Portable Router with Access Point/WISP/Router Modes (TL-MR3020)
Interface: 1 10/100Mbps WAN/LAN Port, USB 2.0 Port for 3G modem, a mini USB Port for power supplyButton: Quick Setup Security Button, Reset Button, Mode SwitchExternal Power Supply: 5VDC/1.0AWireless Standards: IEEE 802.11n, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11bShips in Certified Frustration Free PackagingCompatible with Select ATT/Verizon/Sprint/T Mobile USB ModemsIndustry leading 2 year warranty and unlimited technical support; Technical Support: +1 866 225 8139; Hotline en Français: +1 855 987 5465Interface: 1 10/100Mbps WAN/LAN Port, USB 2.0 Port for 3G modem, a mini USB Port for power supplyButton: Quick Setup Security Button, Reset Button, Mode SwitchExternal Power Supply: 5VDC/1.0AWireless Standards: IEEE 802.11n, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11bShips in Certified Frustration Free PackagingCompatible with Select ATT/Verizon/Sprint/T Mobile USB Modems
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18 Reddit comments about TP-Link N150 Wireless 3G/4G Portable Router with Access Point/WISP/Router Modes (TL-MR3020):

u/gtjack9 · 12 pointsr/TechNope
u/RichardBLine · 3 pointsr/amazonecho

The reason the Echo connected to your public network is because the software has special software to detect hotel type Wi-Fi sharing. The Amazon smart plug, and most any other type of smart device, won't be able to connect to this type of network.

Also, you really don't want to connect all of your IOT devices to a public network, where everyone in the building can see your devices. The best thing to do is to buy a router that can connect to a hotel type wifi network, and then create a new private network for your own use. Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00634PLTW/ref=ask_ql_qh_dp_hza will work.

This router says it supports WISP, which is means Wireless Internet Server Provider. Meaning, it should a user interface where it allow you to connect to your hotel type wifi, and then it will create a new private wifi for your to use.

Once you get this new router setup, disconnect your Echo from the public wifi and connect it to this router. Then connect all your IOT devices to this router. The router I mentioned above should do be to do what you want, but it's just an example. Any router that supports WISP mode will work.

u/Sens0r · 3 pointsr/raspberry_pi

I second the idea of a router with OpenWRT, I just got mine last week. I use it for other things but it can do what you need:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00634PLTW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/ssbtoday · 3 pointsr/homelab

The hardware is definitely a TP-Link N150 Wireless 3G/4G Portable Router, but yes as OP mentioned above it's an Atlas Probe.

u/FleshyDagger · 3 pointsr/europe

Fully functional routers can have an average power consumption as low as 0,6W - see TL-MR3020, for example. There is no reason why even larger routers should consume 10+ times more power while serving no considerable traffic (standby). Even under full load, a well-engineered, 5-port, wireless-N router consumes no more than 3W.

u/DocArmoryTech · 2 pointsr/hackedgadgets

TP-link mr3020. Amazon link.

u/oversized_hoodie · 2 pointsr/AskElectronics

I think they mean a fixed cell receiver on the roof and an Ethernet cable to the apartment, although out a window would be easier.

According to this instructable the Vodafone K3565 3G dongle has a (hidden) external antenna port. You could therefore attach a large directional antenna for GSM/3G and point it at the closest tower, enhancing the signal strength. Plug the 3G dongle into a router that supports connections like this. Mount the antenna outside her window, and run the cable for it through there. If there isn't a tower to point the antenna at on her side of the building, put the electronics in a waterproof box on the roof, and run an Ethernet cable to her apartment.

u/r_view · 2 pointsr/verizon

People that have this, please continue trying it in other devices and share success. Wish they'd allow it in regular lte routers. I had Millenicom a few years ago on Verizon, used a Cradlepoint router with a LTE USB stick and my cell signal booster. Worked well. But I'd need something new. Jetpack is ok, but handier in something else. Similar to this with this, just an example. https://www.amazon.com/Verizon-Wireless-LTE-Modem-551L/dp/B0069RXK9G

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Wireless-Portable-Router-TL-MR3020/dp/B00634PLTW

u/BrightWolfIIoT · 2 pointsr/IOT

I have never used this, but it looks like an inexpensive compromise.. https://www.amazon.de/TP-Link-TL-MR3020-WLAN-Router-frustfreie-Verpackung/dp/B00634PLTW/ref=sr_1_1

You could plug a USB modem into it and let it manage the connection for you. Then have an Ethernet cable to plug into.

You should check for the best supported USB modems to go with it... there are some nice reviews showing some supporting configurations. I wouldn't just expect any USB modem to work well for you.

Viel Erfolg!

u/v-_-v · 2 pointsr/HomeNetworking

I'm sorry for your shitty situation, but I will have to say that your setup is not great.

The problem is your windows machine being the middleman, and not only it is inconvenient with port forwarding and such, but it's also a pretty serious security concern.

If you can, get a 4G modem that can use an ethernet cable, then most of your issues go away.

Naturally the problem is that nobody expects 4G to be used for a home network, or if they do, they bundle it in with a router combo, all in one terrible device.

There seem to be stand alone modems, but they have outrageous prices. I would honestly just get this, turning it into bridge mode (so it's just a modem) and hooking it up to your router via ethernet.

Then you can use the DMZ settings on the Asus.

One last thing, it's really the fault of console and console game makers, as there are ways around NAT, especially when you run your own servers, but nope, let's not use this tech... sorry /endrant.

I haven't had any issues with my PS4, but I don't play many online games with it, as I mostly use the PC. Once again, just slap it in the DMZ and it should work.

IP Packet fragmentation is just bad, and they should feel bad. You fix it via MTU window adjustment, and you never ever want to fragment packets (not your fault, console and game maker's fault).

You issue also arises from Windows doing your passing through. I assume that it is also doing NAT, and if your router is too then you have double NAT going on, which your game will love (sarcasm).

Try seeing if windows is doing NAT, this should be visible in the router's (Asus) page as the WAN IP address. If it starts with 192.168. or 10. or 172.16. then you have double NAT and should disable NAT from the ASUS router.

u/Ryvaeus · 2 pointsr/Philippines

I'm sorry, I think you may have misunderstood. The flash stick by itself will only provide a 3G connection to one device, and that's the one it's connected to. The flash stick does not "emit" any kind of wi-fi signal by itself. You might have been thinking of a different device, which Globe/Smart often refer to as a Pocket Wi-Fi, or Mobile Wi-Fi. See here.

There are a couple things you can do to share Internet through your flash stick, though.

The first is a software solution. If you're on a Windows laptop, you can bridge the 4G dongle to your laptop's internal Wi-Fi adapter, most easily done using a program called Connectify, to turn your laptop into a router which shares its Internet connection with other devices via Wi-Fi. You'll need to pay for the PRO version, which allows sharing Internet from 3G/4G sources. With its current ongoing promo of 70% off, its price is cut from Php1,905.48 ($40) to about Php571.64 ($12). I use it myself and am very happy with it.

I'm not familiar with the Mac-equivalent software solution, but I believe you can follow the steps outlined on this site and achieve similar results.

The second route is a hardware option. You can get a travel-sized router with a USB port to take your flash stick and have it do the same thing described above, that is, share your Internet with more devices. A good one which is very highly rated online in various tech sites is the TP-Link MR3020. You might be able to find this locally, though I've never personally looked for one myself. A business associate of mine recently purchased one in Singapore for SGD 35 (about Php1213.26).

Edit: I know this isn't ideal as both methods might cost you more money. If it's any consolation, going with either of these solutions will let you connect more than 5 additional devices to the Internet, and their usefulness extends beyond solving your single USB flash stick problem.

Edit 2: There is a third solution as well. You can try appealing to Globe's good side (ha) and explain that you were misled into believing that the 4G Flash Stick would allow you to share Internet the same way their Mobile Wi-Fi would. Perhaps they'll agree to an exchange and let you pay the difference for the device you actually wanted. Be warned though that these pocket wi-fi devices regularly retail on their own in tech stores for anywhere between 3.5-6k.

u/earthlover7 · 1 pointr/india

I tried that but ultimately ICS isn't working. Would try again after a few hours. However I'm planning on buying this router.

u/snowcrashedx · 1 pointr/Ubiquiti

Isn't this the same thing for ~$120 less? https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00634PLTW/

u/bionicnomad · 1 pointr/travel

I use the TP-Link N150

It works like a charm everywhere, just buy a SIM card wherever you are. They're cheap.

u/glennerooo · 1 pointr/darknetplan

I'm not trying to argue with you here, but just FYI the TL-MR3020 is OpenWRT compatible (DD-WRT was actually based on OpenWRT) and also PirateBox compatible - which is more or less what you've built here - a large solar-powered PirateBox. Also it's powered by mini-USB and is literally pocket-sized. And you can get one new for ~30 Euro..

I guess either choice would be a winner.

u/haveacigaro · 1 pointr/arduino

That's pretty cool. I noticed its running openwrt so you could use one of these.

u/nilchaos_white · 1 pointr/raspberry_pi

I made a build for WiFi in my car - though instead of bogging the raspberry Pi down with doing such a task I just bought one of these.

Everything gets tucked away behind the dash with a 3G dongle with external antenna, takes power over USB and I can't really fault it for what I do. Plus everything can just be reused elsewhere if I need to strip it down.

u/bakedpatato · 1 pointr/3DS

if you travel quite a bit or just want a really small router the TP-Link TL-MR3020 is pretty useful especially with the external antenna mod